David Ortiz: “Playing here used to be fun … it’s starting to become the s***hole it used to be”

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There hasn’t been any huge drama in Red Sox land in, like, hours, so David Ortiz went off on a big anti-media rant in the clubhouse before today’s game.

CSNNE.com has the details (and video), starting with Ortiz being asked if he was having fun this season:

Not really. Too much s***, man. People need to leave us alone and let us play baseball. It’s starting to become the s***hole it used to be. Playing here used to be so much fun. Now, every day is something new, not related to baseball. People need to leave us alone. Every day is something new, some drama, some more s***. I’m tired of that, man. I’m here to play baseball, man.

Well then.

For much of this week multiple Red Sox players, including Ortiz, have denied various reports that the clubhouse environment has turned toxic.

His comments aren’t likely to go over well with fans or the media, but it’s easy to see why Ortiz is frustrated. Not only are the Red Sox above .500 despite an ugly 4-10 start, going 31-23 since then, but he’s hitting .313 with 18 homers and a 1.012 OPS in 68 games for his best production since 2007. He’s playing amazingly well, the team is on a 93-win pace since a terrible first two weeks despite an incredible number of key injuries, and all anyone wants to talk about are off-field issues, real or imagined.

(For a lot more on the entire situation, read Sean McAdam’s full write-up here.)

Ex-Angels employee charged in overdose death of Tyler Skaggs

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FORT WORTH, Texas — A former Angels employee has been charged with conspiracy to distribute fentanyl in connection with last year’s overdose death of Angels pitcher Tyler Skaggs, prosecutors in Texas announced Friday.

Eric Prescott Kay was arrested in Fort Worth, Texas, and made his first appearance Friday in federal court, according to Erin Nealy Cox, the U.S. Attorney for the Northern District of Texas. Kay was communications director for the Angels.

Skaggs was found dead in his hotel room in the Dallas area July 1, 2019, before the start of what was supposed to be a four-game series against the Texas Rangers. The first game was postponed before the teams played the final three games.

Skaggs died after choking on his vomit with a toxic mix of alcohol and the powerful painkillers fentanyl and oxycodone in his system, a coroner’s report said. Prosecutors accused Kay of providing the fentanyl to Skaggs and others, who were not named.

“Tyler Skaggs’s overdose – coming, as it did, in the midst of an ascendant baseball career – should be a wake-up call: No one is immune from this deadly drug, whether sold as a powder or hidden inside an innocuous-looking tablet,” Nealy Cox said.

If convicted, Kay faces up to 20 years in prison. Federal court records do not list an attorney representing him, and an attorney who previously spoke on his behalf did not immediately return a message seeking comment.