Jayson Werth aims to return from broken wrist by August 1

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Six weeks ago Jayson Werth was given a 9-12 week recovery timetable for his broken left wrist and he’s basically still on that same track, with manager Davey Johnson saying yesterday that the Nationals hope to have the outfielder back around August 1.

Mark Zuckerman of CSNWashington.com reports that Werth is no longer wearing a cast on the wrist, which he had repaired via surgery on May 6, but likely won’t be cleared to begin baseball activities until mid-July.

Ryan Zimmerman’s disabled list stint followed by Werth’s injury led to the Nationals giving Bryce Harper an extended chance and the 19-year-old phenom has hit .289 with seven homers and an .882 OPS in 45 games while splitting his time pretty evenly between right field and center field. By comparison Werth hit .238 with 23 homers and a .732 OPS in his first 177 games for the Nationals.

Once everyone is healthy the Nationals could potentially use an outfield of Mike Morse, Harper, and Werth, but for now rookie Steve Lombardozzi will continue to play regularly in left field.

Minor League Baseball eclipses 40 million in attendance for 14th consecutive season

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Minor League Baseball announced on Wednesday that, for the 14th consecutive season, the league has eclipsed 40 million in total attendance. 20 teams set single-game attendance records and seven teams set franchise records for single-game attendance in their current parks.

ESPN’s Keith Law, who has been covering the minor leagues for quite a while, did the math:

Minor League Baseball president and CEO Pat O’Conner, whose most prominent stint in the public eye involved him disingenuously justifying the underpaying of his players, said, “Minor League Baseball continues to be the best entertainment value in sports, and these numbers support that. For us to top 40 million fans for the 14th consecutive season despite the weather challenges our teams faced in April and May is a testament to the continued support of our loyal fan bases and the creative promotions and hard work done by all of our teams across the country.”

Major and Minor League Baseball are quite happy to make money hand over fist on the backs of their players, but are too cheap to pay them adequately for their labor.