Settling the Score: Friday’s results

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Last night’s matchup between Clayton Kershaw and Chris Sale had all the makings of a classic pitchers’ duel. But as it often happens in this game, things didn’t exactly turn out as expected.

Adam Dunn set the tone early by slugging a two-run homer off Kershaw in the top of the first inning. It was his major league-leading 23rd homer of the season and the fourth of his career against Kershaw. No other player has more than two against the 2011 National League Cy Young award winner. Kershaw ended up allowing five runs (four earned) over six innings.

Sale actually carried a four-run cushion into the bottom of the sixth, but he was chased after giving up two runs on three hits and a walk. The young southpaw was replaced by Jesse Crain, who allowed a two-run double to Elian Herrera and an RBI single to Juan Rivera which put the Dodgers in front. Sale ended up being charged with a season-high five runs over 5 2/3 innings. It was the first time he had allowed more than two runs in a start since May 12.

Even though the Kershaw-Sale matchup didn’t live up to the billing, this was still a very entertaining ballgame. After the White Sox pulled even in the top of the eighth on Alex Rios’ second homer of the night, the Dodgers took the lead in the bottom half of the frame when James Loney scampered home on a wild pitch thrown by left-hander Matt Thornton. Kenley Jansen then tossed a 1-2-3 top of the ninth to finish off the 7-6 victory.

The Dodgers still own the best record in the majors at 41-24 and currently lead the Giants by four games in the National League West.

Your Friday box scores:

Red Sox 0, Cubs 3

Pirates 0, Indians 2

Rockies 12, Tigers 4 (10 innings)

Yankees 7, Nationals 2

Phillies 0, Blue Jays 3

Marlins 0, Rays 11

Orioles 2, Braves 4

Astros 2, Rangers 6

Brewers 5, Twins 3

Royals 3, Cardinals 2

Diamondbacks 5, Angels 0

Reds 7, Mets 3

Padres 2, Athletics 10

Giants 4, Mariners 2

Marlins unveil what they’re putting in the space where the home run sculpture used to be

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Not long after the new ownership group bought the Miami Marlins, face of the franchise Derek Jeter made it clear that he wanted the home runs sculpture beyond the outfield fence gone. In October they announced that it would, in fact, be moving out to a plaza or the parking lot or someplace you’re unlikely to ever see it because who goes to Marlins games?

Today we got a tease of what the Marlins are doing with the space the sculpture is vacating:

It was only a matter of time before that green wall went away. There are a lot of things I like about the overall aesthetic of Marlins Park, but almost all of them are because of their novelty. Jeff Loria was bad for a lot of reasons, but one of the few good things he did was eschew nostalgia and traditionalism with the ballpark. Nostalgia and traditionalism, unfortunately, is the straw that stirs baseball’s drink, so any “weird” colors or flourishes were gonna be beat out of that place as the years went on. It was inevitable.

As for the “three-tier social space,” here’s hoping that tickets for it are cheap or the Marlins start winning ballgames soon, because the Marlins can’t really fill their existing spectator spaces now.