Antonio Bastardo lost a fight against a piece of exercise equipment

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After Antonio Bastardo gave up one run on two hits in an inning of work Wednesday night against the Twins, he decided to take his frustrations out on a squat machine in the weight room at Target Field. Bad idea.

Matt Gelb of the Philadelphia Inquirer reports that Bastardo walked away with a large gash above his left eye, which was “nearly swollen shut” after last night’s game. Phillies manager Charlie Manuel told Jim Salisbury of CSNPhilly.com this morning that he could have an infection. The southpaw is unlikely to pitch today and could be rested for a couple more days until the swelling goes down.

And no, it is not OK to use Bastardo’s injury as an excuse to avoid the gym this weekend.

MLB investigation confirms that the baseball has changed

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You know the baseballs are different. We know the baseballs are different. Pitchers have been saying the baseballs are different. And now Major League Baseball has acknowledged that the baseballs are different in a report of findings by a team of scientists from some of the top universities in the world, like Stanford, Caltech, and M.I.T.

You can read the whole thing here in PDF form. Here’s the gist …

The ball is not bouncier — or “juiced” — but it is most definitely carrying farther. From MLB.com’s Anthony Castrovince …

Though the study did not discover meaningful changes in the ball’s lift, it found that the drag coefficient of MLB balls has decreased since 2015. The researchers used a physics model to calculate that if the change in home run rate was attributable entirely to changes in drag, one would expect the drag coefficient to have decreased by approximately 0.012. The exact change in drag coefficient in the time period studied — if you’re scoring at home — was 0.0153.

It’s not the seams or the core that has changed — those aspects were tested — and it’s not the weather either. In fact, the commision couldn’t figure out what is causing the decrease in drag, despite numerous tests on all elements of the ball. It might simply come down to manufacturing advancements. Looking at you, Rawlings …

“Rawlings is always trying to improve the manufacturing process to make it more uniform,” Alan Nathan, professor emeritus of physics at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign told MLB.com. “So the interesting question that comes up is whether the goal should be to improve the manufacturing process or to keep the ball performing exactly the way it is, regardless of whether it’s improved or not.”

Baseball Prospectus began studying this three years ago, as home runs began to increase around the league. Their write-up on MLB’s report is a must-read.