The Athletics have released Manny Ramirez

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This might be the end of the road for Man-Ram.

The Athletics just announced that they have released Manny Ramirez at his request.

This comes as surprising news, but perhaps it shouldn’t be. Ramirez was eligible to return from his 50-game PED suspension at the end of May, but the A’s kept him with Triple-A Sacramento because they weren’t satisfied with his production. The 40-year-old was then bothered by hamstring tightness. He has turned things around a bit recently, hitting safely in six straight games, but he hasn’t shown any of the power we’ve seen from him in the past.

Ramirez ended his stint with the the River Cats with a .302/.348/.349 batting line in 69 plate appearances. He collected three doubles and zero homers while posting a 17/5 K/BB ratio.

UPDATE: Courtesy of Ken Rosenthal of FOXSports.com, here’s a statement from Ramirez’s agents at Praver Shapiro Sports Management:

“Manny believes he has demonstrated that he is ready to return to the major leagues. However, given that the Athletics could not give Manny any assurance that they plan to promote him in the immediate future he asked for his release. Manny thanks the Athletics for providing him with this opportunity.”

The Athletics enter tonight’s action dead-last in the majors with a .224 batting average. If they aren’t willing to give Manny a shot, what does that tell you?

Sandy Koufax to be honored with statue at Dodger Stadium

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Bill Shaikin of the Los Angeles Times reports that Hall of Fame pitcher Sandy Koufax will be honored with a statue at Dodger Stadium, expected to be unveiled in 2020. Dodger Stadium will be undergoing major renovations, expected to cost around $100 million, after the season. Koufax’s statue will go in a new entertainment plaza beyond center field. The current statue of Jackie Robinson will be moved into the same area.

Koufax, 83, had a relatively brief career, pitching parts of 12 seasons in the majors, but they were incredible. He was a seven-time All-Star who won the National League Cy Young Award three times (1963, ’65-66) and the NL Most Valuable Player Award once (’63). He contributed greatly to the ’63 and ’65 championship teams and authored four no-hitters, including a perfect game in ’65.

Koufax was also influential in other ways. As Shaikin notes, Koufax refused to pitch Game 1 of the 1965 World Series to observe Yom Kippur. It was an act that would attract national attention and turn Koufax into an American Jewish icon.

Ahead of the 1966 season, Koufax and Don Drysdale banded together to negotiate against the Dodgers, who were trying to pit the pitchers against each other. They sat out spring training, deciding to use their newfound free time to sign  on to the movie Warning Shot. Several weeks later, the Dodgers relented, agreeing to pay Koufax $125,000 and Drysdale $110,000, which was then a lot of money for a baseball player. It would be just a few years later that Curt Flood would challenge the reserve clause. Koufax, Drysdale, and Flood helped the MLB Players Association, founded in 1966, gain traction under the leadership of Marvin Miller.