There was a big baseball scandal, sorta

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Ben Badler of Baseball America reports on an age/identity scandal involving one of the more notable buscones in the Dominican Republic, who actually falsified his own son’s age in order to induce the Mariners into signing him:

A son of Enrique Soto, one of the most powerful trainers in the Dominican Republic over the last two decades, used a false age when he signed with the Mariners in 2007, according to multiple sources familiar with the case.

George Soto signed with Seattle for $700,000 in February 2007, presenting himself as a 17-year-old shortstop with a birthdate of Nov. 19, 1989. According to George Soto’s new paperwork, he was born Nov. 17, 1985, which would have made him 21 when he signed.

That’s interesting as far as these things go and will likely be cited by MLB as one of the excesses of the current system as it continues to push for an international draft.  But that’s not why I’m posting this. I’m posting this because, man, I kinda feel let down.

Why? Because almost all of the baseball people on Twitter were watching this one closely for like a half hour thanks to Badler’s delicious tweet prior to posting the story:

Exciting! So exciting that it led to all kinds of fun and mostly ridiculous speculation as to what it might be.  Among my favorites:

 

 

My personal theory involved either (a) Aroldis Chapman being Keyser Soze; or (b) players actually taking them two or three games at a time instead of the alleged one game at a time they so often claim.

So, yeah, I’m let down. It’s not Badler’s fault. He’s a fine reporter and on his beat this stuff with Enrique Soto is big news and is, technically, scandalous.

But I really was hoping that we were aiming higher, or lower, on this sleepy Wednesday afternoon.

Chad Kuhl underwent elbow surgery

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Per Todd Tomczyk, the Pirates’ director of sports medicine, starter Chad Kuhl underwent right elbow surgery on Wednesday, MLB.com’s Adam Berry reports. The Pirates should provide more details about the nature of the surgery and Kuhl’s timetable soon.

Kuhl, 26, has been out of action since late June with a strained right forearm. He had been on a throwing program but experienced a setback earlier this month.

This season, Kuhl made 16 starts, putting up a 4.55 ERA with 81 strikeouts and 33 walks across 85 innings.