There was a big baseball scandal, sorta

11 Comments

Ben Badler of Baseball America reports on an age/identity scandal involving one of the more notable buscones in the Dominican Republic, who actually falsified his own son’s age in order to induce the Mariners into signing him:

A son of Enrique Soto, one of the most powerful trainers in the Dominican Republic over the last two decades, used a false age when he signed with the Mariners in 2007, according to multiple sources familiar with the case.

George Soto signed with Seattle for $700,000 in February 2007, presenting himself as a 17-year-old shortstop with a birthdate of Nov. 19, 1989. According to George Soto’s new paperwork, he was born Nov. 17, 1985, which would have made him 21 when he signed.

That’s interesting as far as these things go and will likely be cited by MLB as one of the excesses of the current system as it continues to push for an international draft.  But that’s not why I’m posting this. I’m posting this because, man, I kinda feel let down.

Why? Because almost all of the baseball people on Twitter were watching this one closely for like a half hour thanks to Badler’s delicious tweet prior to posting the story:

Exciting! So exciting that it led to all kinds of fun and mostly ridiculous speculation as to what it might be.  Among my favorites:

 

 

My personal theory involved either (a) Aroldis Chapman being Keyser Soze; or (b) players actually taking them two or three games at a time instead of the alleged one game at a time they so often claim.

So, yeah, I’m let down. It’s not Badler’s fault. He’s a fine reporter and on his beat this stuff with Enrique Soto is big news and is, technically, scandalous.

But I really was hoping that we were aiming higher, or lower, on this sleepy Wednesday afternoon.

Grudge continues to fester between Braves, Marlins

Carmen Mandato/Getty Images
2 Comments

The Braves and Marlins have some bad blood, especially concerning Ronald Acuña Jr. Around this time last year, José Ureña intentionally threw at Acuña in the first at-bat of a game, leading to a benches-clearing incident. Acuña was hit on the elbow and exited the game but was ultimately fine. Acuña’s crime? Just being good at baseball. At the time, he had homered in five consecutive games, including three games against the Marlins.

In 2019, the first-place Braves and last-place Marlins have mostly minded their own business. The Marlins, however, can certainly keep a grudge it appears. With his first pitch in the bottom of the first inning Tuesday night in Atlanta, Marlins starter Elieser Hernández hit Acuña in the hip.

Home plate umpire Alan Porter issued warnings to both dugouts. Braves manager Brian Snitker wasn’t happy about his side having received a warning for no reason, and was ejected by first base umpire Mark Wegner. Hernández would hit Adeiny Hechavarría with a pitch in the fourth inning — seemingly unintentionally — and was not ejected. Other than that, there were no more incidents and cooler heads prevailed.

Acuña finished 1-for-4 in the Braves’ 5-1 win. Freddie Freeman hit two home runs and knocked in four runs.