Impostor crashes the Braves alumni event

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John Sullivan was a Braves’ reliever in the late 70s and the Braves bullpen coach during Bobby Cox’s first stint as Braves manager. He left the team when Cox did in 1981.

John Sullivan was at the Braves alumni event/old timers softball game this past weekend. It was not, however, the correct John Sullivan. Indeed, it was an impostor. And not a very good one.

One who, when asked when he played for the Braves said, “1986 or 1987, I’m not sure.” And who was out of shape even for a guy in his 50s and couldn’t even really swing a softball bat. The guy attended John Smoltz’s number retirement ceremony and a dinner and signed autographs for fans and everything before Bobby Cox, Andy Ashby, Jose Alvarez and others figured him out and confronted him.

“He got most of our cell phone numbers,” said Alvarez, who now resides in Greenville, S.C. “He invited me to appear in a golf tournament.”

So close. But if he thought more about his scam he could have pulled it off, actually. Indeed, all a guy with no apparent baseball ability whatsoever needs to do to make people think he played for the 1986-87 Braves would be to claim he was Andres Thomas.

(Thanks to Tim’s Neighbor for the heads up)

21-year-old Gleyber Torres homers twice off of 44-year-old Bartolo Colon

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Yankees second baseman Gleyber Torres was born on December 13, 1996. That year, Bartolo Colon (who turns 45 years old on Thursday) was wrapping up a season he spent with Double-A Canton-Akron and Triple-A Buffalo. He would debut in the majors the following April.

In a clash of generations, the 21-year-old Torres and Colon squared off on Monday as the Yankees visited the Rangers. Torres won the battle twice, drilling a two-run home run off of Colon in the second inning and a solo shot off of Colon in the fourth. Colon wound up giving up six runs in total on eight hits (including four homers) and a walk with four strikeouts in 5 1/3 innings.

Here is video of the first homer Torres hit:

Torres is the second-youngest Yankee in club history with a multi-homer game. Mickey Mantle was 20 years and 296 days old when he went yard twice on August 11, 1952. Torres is 21 years, 159 days old. Joe DiMaggio was 21-212 when he hit two on June 24, 1936.

So much for respecting one’s elders. We’re currently seeing a youth movement in baseball. 19-year-old Juan Soto hit his first major league homer on Monday against the Padres. 20-year-olds Ronald Acuña and Mike Soroka debuted for the Braves earlier this year. Could 19-year-old Blue Jays prospect Vladimir Guerrero, Jr. join them soon?