Chris Parmelee rejoins Twins after hitting .375 at Triple-A

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Chris Parmelee parlayed a great September call-up into an Opening Day job with the Twins, but then predictably struggled making the jump from Double-A to the majors and was demoted back to the minors after hitting .179 in 27 games.

He took the demotion in stride and then some, hitting .375 with four homers, four doubles, and a 1.208 OPS in 15 games at Triple-A, and today the Twins recalled the 24-year-old first baseman.

At the end of his first stint in Minnesota this season Parmelee was only playing sporadically, so hopefully this time around manager Ron Gardenhire writes him into the lineup consistently so he can continue to develop even if he doesn’t immediately take the American League by storm like he did the International League.

To make room for Parmelee’s return the Twins optioned Cole De Vries to Triple-A, but at least the 27-year-old career minor leaguer and former undrafted free agent picked up a big-league victory.

Minor League Baseball eclipses 40 million in attendance for 14th consecutive season

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Minor League Baseball announced on Wednesday that, for the 14th consecutive season, the league has eclipsed 40 million in total attendance. 20 teams set single-game attendance records and seven teams set franchise records for single-game attendance in their current parks.

ESPN’s Keith Law, who has been covering the minor leagues for quite a while, did the math:

Minor League Baseball president and CEO Pat O’Conner, whose most prominent stint in the public eye involved him disingenuously justifying the underpaying of his players, said, “Minor League Baseball continues to be the best entertainment value in sports, and these numbers support that. For us to top 40 million fans for the 14th consecutive season despite the weather challenges our teams faced in April and May is a testament to the continued support of our loyal fan bases and the creative promotions and hard work done by all of our teams across the country.”

Major and Minor League Baseball are quite happy to make money hand over fist on the backs of their players, but are too cheap to pay them adequately for their labor.