MLB to allow players to use social media during the All-Star Game

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This just came in:

Building off the social media success of the 2011 State Farm Home Run Derby – at which MLB players interacted with fans via Twitter and Facebook live from the field during an MLB event for the first time – Major League Baseball, MLB Advanced Media and the Major League Baseball Players Association today announced an expansion of the initiative that will for the first time include social media activity during the All-Star Game itself.

This time it counts, y’all!

I appreciate that this is not going to truly become a circus because, per the press release, players will only be allowed to update their Twitter feeds and stuff after they are out of the game.  So, while I joked about it on Twitter and expect a million hack columnists to take gratuitous swipes at social media in general,  it’s not like someone is going to strike out because they were uploading pics to Facebook or something.

But this still galls me. Because it is yet another example of baseball wanting to use the All-Star Game as a big marketing showcase and general free-for-all while still having the game determine the truly important matter of who gets home field advantage in the World Series. In a real game, a player would get fined and ostracized if he was caught tweeting during a game, even if he was on the bench. Here? Have it, fellas.

Major League Baseball: either admit that the All-Star Game is nothing but a fun and meaningless exhibition and take the home field advantage aspects of it away or else treat it like a real friggin’ baseball game, both in terms of roster selection and game play experience.  Because trying to make it both is a terrible idea.

21-year-old Gleyber Torres homers twice off of 44-year-old Bartolo Colon

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Yankees second baseman Gleyber Torres was born on December 13, 1996. That year, Bartolo Colon (who turns 45 years old on Thursday) was wrapping up a season he spent with Double-A Canton-Akron and Triple-A Buffalo. He would debut in the majors the following April.

In a clash of generations, the 21-year-old Torres and Colon squared off on Monday as the Yankees visited the Rangers. Torres won the battle twice, drilling a two-run home run off of Colon in the second inning and a solo shot off of Colon in the fourth. Colon wound up giving up six runs in total on eight hits (including four homers) and a walk with four strikeouts in 5 1/3 innings.

Here is video of the first homer Torres hit:

Torres is the second-youngest Yankee in club history with a multi-homer game. Mickey Mantle was 20 years and 296 days old when he went yard twice on August 11, 1952. Torres is 21 years, 159 days old. Joe DiMaggio was 21-212 when he hit two on June 24, 1936.

So much for respecting one’s elders. We’re currently seeing a youth movement in baseball. 19-year-old Juan Soto hit his first major league homer on Monday against the Padres. 20-year-olds Ronald Acuña and Mike Soroka debuted for the Braves earlier this year. Could 19-year-old Blue Jays prospect Vladimir Guerrero, Jr. join them soon?