The first overall pick is from Puerto Rico, but it’s not something Bud Selig should be crowing about

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The first overall pick in the draft was Carlos Correa, from Puerto Rico.  This made Bud Selig happy (scroll to second item):

Commissioner Bud Selig was thrilled to see Houston select 17-year-old shortstop Carlos Correa with the top pick in the draft. Correa played at the Puerto Rico Baseball Academy, and Major League Baseball is always looking to grow the game and foster talent outside the 50 states.

“Wonderful. It really is. It’s everything we’re trying to accomplish, in a lot of ways,” Selig said. “So I’m very pleased. Very pleased.”

There is lots of talk about how he’s the highest draft pick out of Puerto Rico ever, and how that’s such a great thing for the Puerto Rico Baseball Academy.  And it is. But it’s also misleading.

There has only been a draft for players from Puerto Rico since 1989. Before that players from Puerto Rico were free agents, just like international players.  Also before that there were many more players from Puerto Rico in affiliated baseball than there are now, with most experts saying that the institution of the draft drove many away from baseball due to the far worse economic rewards compared to life under free agency.

The Puerto Rico Baseball Academy, then, wasn’t something that elevated baseball on the island. It was something that, at best, is trying to make up for the destruction Major League Baseball wrought to amateur baseball there by imposing the draft in the first place.

That Correa is the number one pick is a good thing for him, for Puerto Rico and for baseball.  That it took 23 years to get a number one overall pick from the land that produced Roberto Clemente, Orlando Cepeda and Roberto Alomar is not something that Bud Selig should be particularly proud of “accomplishing,” however.

Ex-Angels employee charged in overdose death of Tyler Skaggs

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FORT WORTH, Texas — A former Angels employee has been charged with conspiracy to distribute fentanyl in connection with last year’s overdose death of Angels pitcher Tyler Skaggs, prosecutors in Texas announced Friday.

Eric Prescott Kay was arrested in Fort Worth, Texas, and made his first appearance Friday in federal court, according to Erin Nealy Cox, the U.S. Attorney for the Northern District of Texas. Kay was communications director for the Angels.

Skaggs was found dead in his hotel room in the Dallas area July 1, 2019, before the start of what was supposed to be a four-game series against the Texas Rangers. The first game was postponed before the teams played the final three games.

Skaggs died after choking on his vomit with a toxic mix of alcohol and the powerful painkillers fentanyl and oxycodone in his system, a coroner’s report said. Prosecutors accused Kay of providing the fentanyl to Skaggs and others, who were not named.

“Tyler Skaggs’s overdose – coming, as it did, in the midst of an ascendant baseball career – should be a wake-up call: No one is immune from this deadly drug, whether sold as a powder or hidden inside an innocuous-looking tablet,” Nealy Cox said.

If convicted, Kay faces up to 20 years in prison. Federal court records do not list an attorney representing him, and an attorney who previously spoke on his behalf did not immediately return a message seeking comment.