Brett Lawrie needs to play a little smarter

22 Comments

The hustle is great, but Brett Lawrie’s tendency to play baseball like a bull in a china shop has hurt the Jays from time to time. Of course, the incident that led to last month’s four-game suspension was the most notable occasion. Saturday’s showing was none too impressive, though.

With two outs in the eighth inning and the Blue Jays down to the Red Sox by two runs, Lawrie was thrown out stealing third base, sending the game to the ninth.

And that’s the kind of play that just can’t happen. It’s a situation in which the runner has to be 100 percent sure he’ll make it if he goes. Lawrie must have seen third baseman Kevin Youkilis pulled over towards shortstop with the left-handed-hitting David Cooper up and figured the Red Sox might not even try the throw. Throw they did, though, and they were able to get Lawrie even though Youkilis fell over trying to make the play.

Lawrie is a terrific talent and is one of the most entertaining players to watch in the league today. He’s also a cocky kid with plenty of growing up left to do. Blue Jays fans better hope that wisdom comes with experience because he’s going to need it to reach his potential.

Report: Mets sign Brad Brach to one-year, $850,000 contract

Bryan Woolston/Getty Images
Leave a comment

The Athletic’s Ken Rosenthal reports that the Mets and free agent reliever Brad Brach have agreed on a one-year deal worth $850,000. The contract includes a player option for the 2021 season with a base salary of $1.25 million and additional performance incentives.

Brach, 33, signed as a free agent with the Cubs this past February. After posting an ugly 6.13 ERA over 39 2/3 innings, the Cubs released him in early August. The Mets picked him up shortly thereafter. Brach’s performance improved, limiting opposing hitters to six runs on 15 hits and three walks with 15 strikeouts in 14 2/3 innings through the end of the season.

While Brach will add some much-needed depth to the Mets’ bullpen, his walk rate has been going in the wrong direction for the last three seasons. It went from eight percent in 2016 to 9.5, 9.7, and 12.8 percent from 2017-19. Needless to say the Mets are hoping that trend starts heading in the other direction next season.