Bad news for you if you want to watch the Nats or Orioles in North Carolina

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A legal ruling in the Fourth Circuit pretty much encapsulates all that is wrong with the current broadcasting regime in Major League Baseball:

Nationals and Orioles: We want the cable company in North Carolina to carry our regional sports network so that our fans in that great state can watch their O’s and Nats play! And [cough] so we can make some more money!

The Local Cable Company: We don’t want to carry the Nationals and Orioles. No one likes ’em down here.

FCC: Yeah, what they said.

Court: We agree. No one should have to broadcast Nats and O’s games in North Carolina [judge does Tomahawk Chop, checks his tee time at Augusta National].

Nats and O’s fans who live in North Carolina: Well, I guess we should just watch them on MLB.tv then. Thank goodness there is a means for people who live far from their team’s home to enjoy the games all the same!

Major League Baseball:  North Carolina is Nationals and Orioles territory! You can’t watch Nats and O’s games there unless you do it via your local cable company! Sorry! You’re blacked out!

Fabulous system we have here.

Twins to retire Joe Mauer’s No. 7

AP Photo/Jim Mone
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Twins senior director of communications Dustin Morse announced that the Twins will honor former C/1B Joe Mauer by retiring his uniform number 7. Mauer announced his retirement from baseball on November 9.

Mauer will join Harmon Killebrew (No. 3), Tony Oliva (No. 6), Tom Kelly (No. 10), Kent Hrbek (No. 14), Rod Carew (No. 29), Kirby Pucket (No. 34), and Bert Blyleven (No. 28) as Twins to have their numbers retired.

Mauer, 35, spent 15 seasons in the majors, all with the Twins. He posted a career .306/.388/.439 triple-slash line with 143 home runs and 923 RBI. He won the AL MVP Award in 2009, won the batting title three times, earned three Gold Gloves and five Silver Sluggers, and made the AL All-Star team six times. Sadly, his career was limited due to injuries, including a concussion that caused him to move from catcher to first base.

Five years from now, Mauer will appear on the Hall of Fame ballot. There will certainly be some arguments for and against his candidacy. He retired with 55.1 career Wins Above Replacement, according to Baseball Reference, which definitely puts him in the conversation. But, as always, there’s never a consensus.