Jonathan Lucroy out four to six weeks with hand fracture

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UPDATE: The diagnosis is in and it’s not good. According to Mike Vassallo, the Brewers’ director of media relations, Lucroy has been placed on the 15-day disabled list with a boxer’s fracture of the right hand.

Brewers assistant general manager Gord Ash told Adam McCalvy of MLB.com that he’ll be sidelined for the next four to six weeks. Brutal news.

7:32 PM: This is not a joke, Brewers fans.

According to Adam McCalvy of MLB.com, Jonathan Lucroy was sent for X-rays after injuring his right hand in a freak accident. Lucroy said he suffered the injury when he reached down under his hotel room bed last night for a lost sock and his wife adjusted a suitcase, which fell on his hand. Seriously.

Lucroy reported to Dodger Stadium to attempt to take some swings, but he shut things down after it became apparent that his hand was too bruised for him to grip the bat properly. The injury-riddled Brewers are currently crossing their fingers for some rare good news. George Kottaras, who had some cramping in his hamstring yesterday, will start behind the plate tonight.

Lucroy is off to a fantastic start this season, batting .345/.387/.583 with five home runs, 30 RBI and a .969 OPS in 151 plate appearances. The 25-year-old is hitting a cool .388 this month.

The Angels are giving managerial candidates a two-hour written test

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Jon Morosi of MLB.com reports that the Los Angeles Angels are administering a two-hour written test to managerial candidates. The test presents “questions spanning analytical, interpersonal and game-management aspects of the job,” according to Morosi.

I can’t find any reference to it, but I remember another team doing some form of written testing for managerial candidates within the past couple of years. Questions which presented tactical dilemmas, for example. I don’t recall it being so intense, however. And then, as now, I have a hard time seeing experienced candidates wanting to sit for a two-hour written exam when their track record as a manager, along with an interview to assess compatibility should cover most of it. Just seems like an extension of the current trend in which front offices are taking away authority and, with this, some measure of professional respect, from managers.