Curt Schilling’s 38 Studios is no more

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Curt Schilling’s 38 Studios, which released its first game to generally positive reviews earlier this year, closed its doors Thursday, laying off its entire staff.

Despite having received a $75 million loan guarantee from Rhode Island, the company failed to stay afloat while trying to develop a large-scale MMO called Copernicus. This despite the fact that the game it released this February, Kingdoms of Amalur: Reckoning, sold 1.2 million copies in its first 90 days, according to Schilling.

38 Studios’ future had been uncertain after it missed a scheduled payment to Rhode Island earlier this month. It was later reported that in trying to make a late payment of $1.1 million, the company gave the state a bad check.

Schilling, an avid gamer even during his years in the majors, was hoping Copernicus would make a dent in the lucrative MMO market largely ruled by World of Warcraft. It was to be the first game developed by 38 Studios. Reckoning was developed by Big Huge Games, a company bought by 38 Studios in 2010.

Twins to retire Joe Mauer’s No. 7

AP Photo/Jim Mone
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Twins senior director of communications Dustin Morse announced that the Twins will honor former C/1B Joe Mauer by retiring his uniform number 7. Mauer announced his retirement from baseball on November 9.

Mauer will join Harmon Killebrew (No. 3), Tony Oliva (No. 6), Tom Kelly (No. 10), Kent Hrbek (No. 14), Rod Carew (No. 29), Kirby Pucket (No. 34), and Bert Blyleven (No. 28) as Twins to have their numbers retired.

Mauer, 35, spent 15 seasons in the majors, all with the Twins. He posted a career .306/.388/.439 triple-slash line with 143 home runs and 923 RBI. He won the AL MVP Award in 2009, won the batting title three times, earned three Gold Gloves and five Silver Sluggers, and made the AL All-Star team six times. Sadly, his career was limited due to injuries, including a concussion that caused him to move from catcher to first base.

Five years from now, Mauer will appear on the Hall of Fame ballot. There will certainly be some arguments for and against his candidacy. He retired with 55.1 career Wins Above Replacement, according to Baseball Reference, which definitely puts him in the conversation. But, as always, there’s never a consensus.