Juan Carlos Oviedo close to getting work visa, must still serve eight-week suspension

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El Caribe in the Dominican Republic reports that Juan Carlos Oviedo has finally received his work visa and the Marlins reliever formerly known as Leo Nunez will soon make his way to the United States nearly six months after being charged with identity fraud.

However, don’t expect to see him in the Marlins’ bullpen any time soon. Once he arrives Oviedo will begin serving an eight-week suspension and continue losing out on his $6 million salary.

Oviedo was the Marlins’ closer for the past three seasons, saving 92 games before the team pushed him out of the ninth-inning role and signed Heath Bell to a three-year, $27 million deal. If healthy and effective Oviedo could emerge as a setup man for Bell, but he’s two months from even being on the Marlins’ radar and hasn’t faced big-league hitters since September 21.

UPDATE: Enrique Rojas of ESPN Deportes has a slightly different report, saying that Oviedo has received a pardon from the U.S. State Department that is necessary before getting a visa but has not gotten the actual visa yet.

MLB calls umpire union statement about Manny Machado discipline “inappropriate”

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Earlier today the Major League Baseball Umpire’s Association made multiple posts on social media registering its displeasure at what it feels was the league’s weak discipline of Manny Machado following his run-in with umpire Bill Welke. It was an unusual statement, as it’s not common for umpires, individual or via their union to comment on such matters.

This evening, in an official statement, the league called it inappropriate:

“Manny Machado was suspended by MLB Chief Baseball Officer Joe Torre, who considered all the facts and circumstances of Machado’s conduct, including precedent, in determining the appropriate level of discipline.  Mr. Machado is appealing his suspension and we do not believe it is appropriate for the union representing Major League Umpires to comment on the discipline of players represented by the Players Association, just as it would not be appropriate for the Players Association to comment on disciplinary decisions made with respect to umpires.  We also believe it is inappropriate to compare this incident to the extraordinarily serious issue of workplace violence.”

That final bit, about workplace violence, is something that I didn’t really consider when I read the umps’ statements, but it’s a damn good point. In an age where people are literally shooting up workplaces, umpires making reference to that kind of thing in response to a player throwing a bat is pretty rich indeed. And in pretty poor taste.