Is Lance Berkman a Hall of Famer?

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There have been several times over the past 12 years or so when Lance Berkman has certainly felt like a Hall of Famer. In the moment, anyway, as he went on tears and put up seasons that matched up with all manner of men in Cooperstown.

But, given that he didn’t have a full time gig until he was 24 and given that he seems to be hitting the end of the road after only 14 seasons — some of them shortened due to injury — it seems pretty likely that Berkman won’t get a lot of love when he becomes eligible for voting.  The counting stats just aren’t there and, no matter what we think of counting stats, they matter and always have for the Hall of Fame.

But that doesn’t mean we can’t appreciate someone who is an inner-circle Hall of Very Gooder, and yesterday David Schoenfield of ESPN.com did just that.  And while David himself can’t convince himself of Berkman’s Hall-worthiness, he does a great job of reminding us just how good a hitter the dude was (and still is, if he comes back from his injury):

So where does that leave us?

• A player who was one of the elite hitters of his generation.
• Ten Hall of Fame-caliber seasons, plus a great partial season in 2000 (.297/.388/.561 in 114 games) and a not-so-great 2010.
• A terrific postseason performer.
• A player who didn’t win an MVP Award but fared well in the voting.

…It’s interesting to compare him to his one-time teammate, Jeff Bagwell, who obviously isn’t in the Hall of Fame (for some reasons we all know about) but whom many of you and in the stat community believe is a no-brainer Hall of Famer …

I’ve probably contributed an awful lot to this, but I sort of hate that Hall of Fame discussions often result in people denigrating the careers of those who fall just short. Making the perfect the enemy of the good as it were.  Good for Schoenfield for celebrating the good.

Brewers to give Mike Moustakas a look at second base

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The Brewers reportedly signed third baseman Mike Moustakas to a one-year, $10 million contract on Sunday. While the deal is not yet official, MLB.com’s Adam McCalvy reports that the Brewers plan to give Moustakas a look at second base during spring training. If all goes well, he will be the primary second baseman and Travis Shaw will stay at third base.

The initial thought was that Moustakas would simply take over at third base for the more versatile Shaw. Moustakas has spent 8,035 of his career defensive innings at third base, 35 innings at first base, and none at second. In fact, he has never played second base as a pro player. Shaw, meanwhile, has spent 268 of his 4,073 1/3 defensive innings in the majors at second base and played there as recently as October.

This is certainly an interesting wrinkle to signing Moustakas, who is a decent third baseman. He was victimized by another slow free agent market, not signing until March last year on a $6.5 million deal with a $15 million mutual option for this season. That option was declined, obviously, and he ended up signing for $5 million cheaper here in February as the Brewers waited him out. Notably, Moustakas did not have qualifying offer compensation attached to him this time around.

Last season, between the Royals and Brewers, the 30-year-old Moustakas hit .251/.315/.459 with 28 home runs and 95 RBI in 635 plate appearances.