Yep, someone took David Ortiz’s “no respect” comments out of context

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When I was looking at the quotes from that David Ortiz article this morning I just knew someone would take the “I don’t get no respect” part out of context and make it look like Ortiz was going on a “me, me, me” rant.  That someone was Kirk Minihane of WEEI:

I sometimes wonder if David Ortiz is legitimately delusional … [his greatest hit] has always been the no respect card. He’s played it time and time again over his career with the Sox and broke it out for another spin on Monday night … The Sox have won nine of 11 games since the meeting and it sure seems that Ortiz would like a couple of attaboys for showing a little initiative … Maybe he’s a leader on this team and maybe he isn’t, but he’d be best served to keep hitting and leave his greatest hit on the shelf.

In context, however, it was pretty clear that the exact opposite was true. He was surprised and not pleased that the story of the closed-door meeting he held got out. He said “I don’t give a [expletive] about anybody knowing what we talk about, No. 1. And No. 2, I don’t give a [expletive] what they call leaders.”

That he then went on to talk about the curious nature of what people consider leadership in Boston does not make him an attention-seeker. Rather, it seems like he’d not play the game at all if he had the choice, but if asked, sure, he’s gonna say what he thinks about it.

But if all people get from his comments are “I don’t get no respect,” he probably shouldn’t bother saying anything at all.

The Nats want Trea Turner to attempt 75-80 stolen bases this year

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When it comes to cliche spring training stories, we talk a lot about “Best Shape of His Life.” Sometimes we talk about the “[Pitcher] has been working on a changeup” or “[Hitter] has made an adjustment to his swing” stories too. Then there’s the “we’re really going to focus on fundamentals” quotes managers love to give in February and March. They’re evergreens. 

Another one in that category is the “we’re going to run more” or “we plan to be aggressive on the base paths this year.” You hear that from at least one or two managers every spring. I imagine because, like the fundamentals one, it deals with something over which they have at least some moderate control. It’s a good quote.

We’re hearing it from Nats training camp this year with respect to one particularly speedy player in Trea Turner. From Mark Zuckerman at MASN:

Davey Martinez called Trea Turner into his office this week and told the speedy shortstop he wants him to attempt more stolen bases this season. How many? Let’s just say even the ultra-aggressive Turner was taken aback.

“Yeah, he gave me a number,” Turner said. “And I was like: ‘Wow, all right.’”

Martinez later revealed to assembled reporters that he thinks if Turner “attempts 75-80, we’ll be in great shape.”

Turner led the National League with 43 stolen bases on 52 attempts in 2018. The year before he attempted 54, which was his career high. Only only four players have attempted 80 or more stolen bases in the past ten years, so yes, 75-80 would be quite the escalation.

Which is not to say it’s silly. On a very basic level, yeah, if he is stealing bases more often, even without changing his basic approach, the Nats WILL be in great shape because it’ll likely mean that he’s on base more, and that’s good. If it’s merely a matter of him being more aggressive in the same number of times on base, well, let me know, but I’m not holding my breath.

I guess it’s nice to have goals, though.