Indians closer Chris Perez will do his part to improve attendance in Cleveland

26 Comments

“Guys don’t want to come over here and people wonder why,” Indians closer Chris Perez told the Elyria Chronicle-Telegram after Saturday’s defeat of the Marlins, attended by just over 29,000 fans.

“Why doesn’t Carlos Beltran want to come over here? Well, because of that. That’s part of it. It doesn’t go unnoticed—trust us. That’s definitely a huge reason. … You had a choice of playing in St. Louis where you get 40,000 (fans) like Beltran chose to do, or you can come to Cleveland. … That’s just how it is.”

The first-place Tribe rank dead last in attendance in the major leagues, averaging only 15,518 per game. Things seem to be getting a little better, but not at as quickly as one would expect in a big sports town.

Perez’s comments were brash and he didn’t apologize for them Sunday, but he is attempting to atone for the harshness with a system on Twitter that will put a small dent in the club’s poor gate draw:

He asked a little personal trivia for the tickets to Sunday’s game: “What is my favorite movie?”

The answer: “Back To The Future.” The first three people to reply correctly got two tickets.

Rangers turn the sort of triple play that has not been done in 106 years

Associated Press
6 Comments

Triple plays are rare. Triple plays in which only two players touch the ball are even more rare. But last night the Texas Rangers turned a triple play that was even more rare than that. Indeed, it was the sort of triple play that had not been turned since a couple of months after the Titanic sank.

Here’s how it went down:

With the bases loaded and nobody out in the fourth inning, David Fletcher of the Angels hit a sharp one-hopper, fielded by third baseman Jurickson Profar. He stepped on third, getting the runner on second base in a force out. He then quickly tagged Taylor Ward, who had been on third base but had broken, thinking the ball was going to get through, and who froze before figuring out what to do. Profar then threw to Rougned Odor, who stepped on second to force the runner out who had been on first. Watch:

Like a lot of weird triple plays, not everyone was sure what had happened immediately. Odor, for example, had already made the third out when he touched the bag but he still attempted to tag out the runner from first, likely not yet having processed it all. The announcer wasn’t aware of it either. Understandable given how fast it all happened. It took me a couple of times watching it to figure it all out.

The historic part of it: according to STATS, Inc., it was the first triple play in 106 years in which the batter was not retired. The last time it happened: June 3, 1912, turned by the Brooklyn Dodgers against the Cincinnati Reds.