4.3% of major leaguers have four-year degrees

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Interesting factoid in Jon Paul Morosi’s column today:

As of Wednesday morning, 917 players had appeared in at least one big-league game this season, according to STATS LLC. Of that group, only 39 — or 4.3 percent — were confirmed by their teams of MLB as having obtained four-year college degrees through a FOXSports.com survey of clubs.

This isn’t an “approve” or “disapprove” factoid. It just is. Because of the nature of college baseball, the draft and the minor league system, playing professional baseball is way less compatible with college than either football or basketball is.  It’s more like trade school, ya know?  The guys who can do the college thing and finish are really going against the grain.

Morosi’s column focuses on Curtis Granderson — one of the 4.3% — and it’s a good read, talking about how he went against that grain and made a degree and the path to the majors work. He’s one impressive dude.

Mike Trout, Willson Contreras homer, A.L. leads 2-1 after three

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Aaron Judge did it first, Mike Trout did it next.

The best player in baseball — who spent the bottom of the second mic’d-up and talking to Joe Buck and John Smoltz about the weather and stuff — came to bat second in the top of the third inning, facing Mets pitcher Jacob deGrom. deGrom is used to pitching with no run support at this point so it’s not like he was uncomfortable I imagine, but you can only get so comfortable when Mike Trout is in the box. Trout took deGrom downtown. Or at the very least to left field to make it 2-0, American League.

The National League took that run right back in the bottom of the third. With the Rays’ Blake Snell in the game, Willson Contreras of the Cubs led off and he wasted no time, depositing Snell’s first pitch just over the railing in left to make it 2-1, American League.