Brett Lawrie isn’t exactly contrite

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There’s a side to Brett Lawrie’s story.

That’s what he said after appealing the four-game suspension handed down by MLB on Wednesday. Lawrie, of course, spiked and hit umpire Bill Miller with his helmet during Tuesday’s game.

And he’s not really sorry about it.

“The only thing I regret is the helmet hitting him,” Lawrie said. “I never meant to do that and it shows. I threw it off the ground, it took a bad hop and it hit him totally by accident. I never meant to throw it at him. As that’s coming across, it seems like a lot of people are saying that I threw it at him, I never threw it at him. I never had any intentions of hurting anybody. I was just frustrated at the play at the time and that’s baseball for you.”

Of course, the bad hop comment is ridiculous. Whether Lawrie meant to hit him or not, the helmet bounced exactly the way it should have given the way he threw it. Lawrie probably didn’t intend to hurt anyone, but he was out of control and nothing so far suggests that he’s learned anything from it.

Twins to retire Joe Mauer’s No. 7

AP Photo/Jim Mone
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Twins senior director of communications Dustin Morse announced that the Twins will honor former C/1B Joe Mauer by retiring his uniform number 7. Mauer announced his retirement from baseball on November 9.

Mauer will join Harmon Killebrew (No. 3), Tony Oliva (No. 6), Tom Kelly (No. 10), Kent Hrbek (No. 14), Rod Carew (No. 29), Kirby Pucket (No. 34), and Bert Blyleven (No. 28) as Twins to have their numbers retired.

Mauer, 35, spent 15 seasons in the majors, all with the Twins. He posted a career .306/.388/.439 triple-slash line with 143 home runs and 923 RBI. He won the AL MVP Award in 2009, won the batting title three times, earned three Gold Gloves and five Silver Sluggers, and made the AL All-Star team six times. Sadly, his career was limited due to injuries, including a concussion that caused him to move from catcher to first base.

Five years from now, Mauer will appear on the Hall of Fame ballot. There will certainly be some arguments for and against his candidacy. He retired with 55.1 career Wins Above Replacement, according to Baseball Reference, which definitely puts him in the conversation. But, as always, there’s never a consensus.