Jeff Passan’s outrage at Josh Beckett goes to 11

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Look, it was apparent as of last night that Josh Beckett was going to get ripped to shreds for the next few days, but I don’t think I was prepared to see as much vitriol thrown his way as Jeff Passan does in his column this morning:

The rot in the Boston Red Sox organization runs too deep for cosmetic upgrades, and nobody better personifies it than Josh Beckett, the clueless, defiant egomaniac who’s poisoning another Red Sox season.

He describes all that has gone down — from beer and chicken through the off-day golf — and then says “This is about common sense, decency and responsibility.”  Which is the same as saying that Beckett is senseless, indecent and irresponsible.

I dunno. It’s one thing to point to an instance of performance and/or behavior and say “that is bad” or “that is dumb.”  It’s another, far more serious thing altogether to say “that person is a piece of shit,” which is what Passan is doing here.  And I just don’t understand what puts anyone who is not close to him in the position to make such an assessment, at least on the facts we know about him and which are being reported.

Is Beckett the quintessential team player? Doesn’t sound like it.  Has he made the best decisions, both in his conditioning and his public attitude and stances? No.

But it seems a little extreme to me to go from pointing out flaws in the man and his game to such sharp, sweeping character assessments as Passan does here.

The Red Sox designate Hanley Ramirez for assignment

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The Boston Red Sox activated Dustin Pedroia from the disabled list today. That’s a big deal. The move they made to make room for him on the roster was a big one too: they designated Hanley Ramirez for assignment. A designation for assignment, of course, means that the Sox have seven days to either trade or release Ramirez.

Ramirez, 34, is experiencing his worst season as a major leaguer thus far, hitting .254/.313/.395 (88 OPS+) in 195 plate appearances as he split time between first base and designated hitter. Given how well Mitch Moreland has hit at first and J.D. Martinez has hit at DH, there is simply no room for Ramirez in the lineup. At the moment the Red Sox have the second best offense in all of baseball despite Ramirez’s performance.

Ramirez, a 14-year big league veteran, won the 2006 Rookie of the Year Award and won the NL batting title in 2009. He has been a below average hitter in three of his last four seasons, however and, long removed from his days as a middle infielder, he has little defensive value these days. That said, his fame and the possibility that he could put together a decent run if used wisely will likely get him some looks from other clubs.