Some deluded baseball fans sue MLB, broadcasters over alleged video monopoly

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Blaming the legal system for stupid lawsuits is kinda like blaming guns for gun violence. They’re just tools that, when properly used, have their place.  It’s the idiots who use them recklessly that are the real problem:

A small group of baseball fans is suing Major League Baseball, its clubs and some television broadcast entities, claiming they collude to eliminate competition in the showing of games on the Internet and television … The lawsuit said the defendants possess monopoly power over the market for video presentations of major league games and have used the power to exclude or limit competition.

If I’m the judge that gets this case, my dismissal entry says “Monopoly power? Nonsense. Plaintiffs have every right to broadcast games themselves too.  In the event they have a billion dollars to buy such rights.”

In other news, yes, that first paragraph is an accurate description of my views on gun rights. Figured I’d inject that because I have been caricatured as a cliche liberal far too often around here lately.  When, in reality, I am a cliche liberal who happens to believe that people have the Constitutional right of private gun ownership in this country.

But yes, the rest of the cliche liberal stuff is probably right, so whatever.

Report: Cardinals to sign Paul Goldschmidt to five-year contract extension

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Extension season continues. The Athletic’s Ken Rosenthal reports that the Cardinals and first baseman Paul Goldschmidt are close to an agreement on a five-year extension. The value is believed to be around $130 million, according to Derrick Goold of the St. Louis Post-Dispatch. Goldschmidt was set to become a free agent after the season.

The Cardinals acquired Goldschmidt, 31, from the Diamondbacks in December in exchange for Luke Weaver, Carson Kelly, Andy Young, and a 2019 competitive balance round B pick. The slugger is a six-time All-Star, a three-time Gold Glove Award winner, and a four-time Silver Slugger Award winner. Goldschmidt owns a career .297/.398/.532 triple-slash line along with 209 home runs, 710 RBI, 709 runs scored, and 124 stolen bases. He is also well-regarded for his defense at first base. As a result, he has accumulated 40.3 Wins Above Replacement over eight seasons, according to Baseball Reference.

With Goldschmidt in place, the Cardinals are set at first base for the foreseeable future. Though Goldschmidt got off to a slow start last season, carrying an OPS barely above .700 into June, he recovered and finished with a .922 OPS. That two-month blip aside, there’s no reason to think Goldschmidt’s production is about to fall off anytime soon.