Colby Lewis gives up five homers, strikes out career-best 12

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It was certainly a case of feast or famine for the Orioles in the first game of Thursday’s doubleheader.

Rangers starter Colby Lewis gave up three straight homers to begin the bottom of the first, retired the next 18 hitters he faced and then surrendered two more homers in the seventh to leave down 6-0 versus Baltimore.

The end result: Lewis struck out a career-high 12 batters and allowed a career-high five homers. Those homers were the only hits he allowed.

Lewis became just the fifth pitcher in major league history to give up five homers and no other hits. Oakland’s Ted Lilly was the last, surrendering five homers in four innings against the Braves on June 11, 2003. Denny McLain (1971), Steve Stone (1974) and Charlie Hough (1989) were the others to manage it. No one has ever given up six homers and no other hits.

The 12 strikeouts was also by far the most for anyone in a game with five homers allowed. Hough struck out nine in that aforementioned start on June 24, 1989, which had been the previous high total. Curt Schilling, on June 28, 1997, was the last pitcher to strike out 12 and give up four homers.

Lewis also issued just one walk on the day. So, while his ERA jumped from 2.97 to 3.69, his WHIP actually dropped from 1.14 to 1.10.

Fox, MLB sign broadcast rights extension through 2028

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FOX Sports and Major League Baseball announced a few minutes ago that they have agreed to a multi-year broadcast rights extension. The deal keeps Fox as the lead MLB rights holder, and home of the World Series, All-Star Game and a good chunk of the playoffs through at least 2028.

While the press release does not announce the financial terms, Bob Nightengale of USA Today is reporting that it will pay Major League Baseball about 30-40% more than the previous contract. While ratings are not what they used to be, it would seem that the eyeballs Fox is getting are more valuable to it.

UPDATE: That bump is actually even bigger:

For the time being, things will look very much like they do now. Starting in 2022, there will be more games broadcast. There are no specifics about how many more. The release says “FOX Sports will also expand its digital rights,” but again, no specifics on what that means, exactly.

FOX Sports has been a baseball rights-holder since 1996 and has been the exclusive national non-cable rights holder since 2001. That’s gonna continue for at least another decade.