Guillermo Mota appeals 100-game suspension, blames positive test on children’s cough medicine

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Yesterday afternoon MLB suspended Guillermo Mota for 100 games following a positive test for the performance-enhancing drug Clenbuterol, but the Giants reliever is appealing the suspension while blaming the positive result on children’s cough medicine.

Mota’s agent, Adam Katz, issued the following statement:

Players are responsible for what they put in their bodies. Guillermo understands that. A 100-game suspension for taking a children’s cough medicine that contains trace amounts of a prohibited substance, which is what happened here, is severe and unfair and does not reflect the intention of the Joint Drug Prevention and Treatment Program. We will appeal it.

Not mentioned in the above statement is that Mota is a second-time offender who was suspended for 50 games after a positive PED test in 2006. And as Andrew Baggarly of CSNBayArea.com notes, “multiple offenders cannot delay their sentence while appealing it.”

In other words, he can go through the appeal process and have his case heard, but in the meantime he’ll be serving the suspension. And presumably not taking any more cough medicine intended for children.

MLB calls umpire union statement about Manny Machado discipline “inappropriate”

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Earlier today the Major League Baseball Umpire’s Association made multiple posts on social media registering its displeasure at what it feels was the league’s weak discipline of Manny Machado following his run-in with umpire Bill Welke. It was an unusual statement, as it’s not common for umpires, individual or via their union to comment on such matters.

This evening, in an official statement, the league called it inappropriate:

“Manny Machado was suspended by MLB Chief Baseball Officer Joe Torre, who considered all the facts and circumstances of Machado’s conduct, including precedent, in determining the appropriate level of discipline.  Mr. Machado is appealing his suspension and we do not believe it is appropriate for the union representing Major League Umpires to comment on the discipline of players represented by the Players Association, just as it would not be appropriate for the Players Association to comment on disciplinary decisions made with respect to umpires.  We also believe it is inappropriate to compare this incident to the extraordinarily serious issue of workplace violence.”

That final bit, about workplace violence, is something that I didn’t really consider when I read the umps’ statements, but it’s a damn good point. In an age where people are literally shooting up workplaces, umpires making reference to that kind of thing in response to a player throwing a bat is pretty rich indeed. And in pretty poor taste.