Clay Buchholz and his 9.09 ERA will stay in the Red Sox’s rotation … for now

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Our own Matthew Pouliot wrote yesterday about Clay Buchholz’s struggles and wondered how much longer the Red Sox would leave him in the rotation.

Buchholz failed to make it out of the fourth inning yesterday as his ERA rose to 9.09, but afterward manager Bobby Valentine told reporters: “I have no plans to change him at this time.”

That obviously leaves the door open for a change in the near future and Valentine did note that “Clay’s performance is not what he wanted or I wanted it to be for sure … he left a lot of pitches in a real hittable zone and gave up a lot of hard-hit balls.’’

Nick Cafardo of the Boston Globe notes that Buchholz has allowed at least five earned runs in all six of his starts, but with Aaron Cook joining Daisuke Matsuzaka on the disabled list the Red Sox are almost forced to give him some more time to get back on track.

MLB calls umpire union statement about Manny Machado discipline “inappropriate”

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Earlier today the Major League Baseball Umpire’s Association made multiple posts on social media registering its displeasure at what it feels was the league’s weak discipline of Manny Machado following his run-in with umpire Bill Welke. It was an unusual statement, as it’s not common for umpires, individual or via their union to comment on such matters.

This evening, in an official statement, the league called it inappropriate:

“Manny Machado was suspended by MLB Chief Baseball Officer Joe Torre, who considered all the facts and circumstances of Machado’s conduct, including precedent, in determining the appropriate level of discipline.  Mr. Machado is appealing his suspension and we do not believe it is appropriate for the union representing Major League Umpires to comment on the discipline of players represented by the Players Association, just as it would not be appropriate for the Players Association to comment on disciplinary decisions made with respect to umpires.  We also believe it is inappropriate to compare this incident to the extraordinarily serious issue of workplace violence.”

That final bit, about workplace violence, is something that I didn’t really consider when I read the umps’ statements, but it’s a damn good point. In an age where people are literally shooting up workplaces, umpires making reference to that kind of thing in response to a player throwing a bat is pretty rich indeed. And in pretty poor taste.