Cole Hamels: ‘I was trying to hit’ Bryce Harper

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Cole Hamels decided to open his big mouth after his outing. It should cost him a five- or six-game suspension.

Hamels plunked brash rookie Bryce Harper in the first inning of Sunday night’s game against the Nationals and admitted afterwards that he was trying to send a message.

Here’s the quote from the Philadelphia Inquirer’s Matt Gelb:

I was trying to hit him. I’m not going to deny it. It’s something I grew up watching. That’s what happened. I’m just trying to continue the old baseball. Some people get away from it. I remember when I was a rookie, the strike zone was really, really small and you didn’t say anything. That’s the way baseball is. Sometimes the league is protecting certain players. It’s that old-school prestigious way of baseball.

Hamels added that he had no intention of injuring Harper. After reaching first, Harper moved along to third on a Jayson Werth single and then stole home when Hamels made a pickoff throw to first. It was his first career steal. And there’s little doubt Harper was sending a message right back to Hamels when he tried it.

Hamels did get the last laugh from there. It was the only run he allowed in eight innings of work, and the Phillies won the game 9-3. In the third inning, he was hit in the leg by a Jordan Zimmermann pitch.

Since Hamels admitted to the intentional plunking, the league shouldn’t have any choice but to suspend him. It’s one of those cases where had simply said the pitch got away from him, nothing would have come of it.

Major League Baseball to launch an elite league for high schoolers

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This morning Major League Baseball announced a new elite league for high school baseball players who are likely to be drafted. It’s called the Prospect Development Pipeline League. It’ll start next summer and it’ll invite 80 of the best current high school juniors to play in a league in Florida from June through early July, culminating in an All-Star Game during MLB’s All-Star week.

The idea behind the league: to combat the current system in which a couple of pay-to-play, for-profit showcase leagues dominate the pre-draft season. Major League Baseball, schools and a lot of players’ parents have criticized this system because it favors rich kids who can afford to play in them. Major League Baseball is also likely quite keen on having greater control over the training, health and physical monitoring of prospects.

As Jeff Passan notes in his report about this, there will be a component of the program which involves live data-tracking of players during games and drills. Major League Baseball has become increasingly interested in such things but is limited in how much it can do in this regard due to labor agreements. There is no such impediment with high schoolers. Your mileage will vary when it comes to how you feel about that, I presume.