The Orioles are going to sign Miguel Tejada

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Earlier this evening I saw someone tweeting about Miguel Tejada and the Orioles signing a deal. I followed it back to the source and found some sketchy looking Spanish language report that claimed to be based on Tejada’s Twitter account. Except, as Enrique Rojas of ESPN noted, Tejada doesn’t have a Twitter account.

Hahaha, I said to myself, how silly for someone to fake a Miguel Tejada to the Orioles report. I mean, what’s the point of faking something so minor and, really, so unnecessary and doomed to failure?

Joke’s on me, though:

The Orioles are closing in on signing veteran infielder Miguel Tejada and he will report to the team’s Spring Training facility in Sarasota, Fla. on Monday to take a physical.

Orioles executive vice president of baseball operations Dan Duquette said the team received favorable reports about Tejada, who is 37, and he will work out for the foreseeable future in extended spring.  The two sides have not reached an exact contract agreement, but that’s expected as long as Monday’s workout and physical go smoothly.

Or, maybe, the joke’s on anyone in the Oriole’s organization who thinks that Tejada has anything left in the tank. He hit .239/.270/.326 with the Giants last year, who cut him. THE GIANTS. They were combing the high schools last year, looking for assistant JV coaches who may have played semi-pro ball in the 90s to see if they could help the offense, for cryin’ out loud.

Oh well. Good luck to all involved. Just don’t pin any hopes on this translating to any major league value whatsoever.

Red Sox employees “livid” over team pay cut plan

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Even Drellich of The Athletic reports that the Boston Red Sox are cutting the pay of team employees. Those cuts, which began to be communicated last night, apply to all employees making $50,000 or more. They are tiered cuts, with people making $50-99,000 seeing salary cut by 20%, those making $100k-$499,000 seeing $25% cuts and those making $500,000 or more getting 30% cuts.

Drellich reported that a Red Sox employee told him that “people are livid” over the fact that those making $100K are being treated the same way as those making $500K. And, yes, that does seem to be a pretty wide spread for similar pay cuts. One would think that a team with as many analytically-oriented people on staff could perhaps break things down a bit more granularly.

Notable in all of this that the same folks who own the Red Sox — Fenway Sports Group — own Liverpool FC of the English Premier League, and that just last month Liverpool’s pay cut/employee furlough policies proved so unpopular that they led to a backlash and a subsequent reversal by the club. That came after intense criticism from Liverpool fan groups and local politicians. Sox owner John Henry must be confident that no such backlash will happen in Boston.

As we noted yesterday, The Kansas City Royals, who are not as financially successful as the Boston Red Sox, have not furloughed employees or cut pay as a result of baseball’s shutdown in the wake of the COVID-19 pandemic. Perhaps someone in Boston could call the Royals and ask them how they managed that.