Keith Olbermann really doesn’t think that Rivera should have been shagging fly balls

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I’m sure Keith Olbermann had written this up in memo form for the Yankees years ago and had planned on sending them to warn them of the dangers of Mariano Rivera shagging fly balls before games. Probably didn’t get there because of some technical problem out of his control:

Girardi is right: Shagging flies has always been integral to Rivera’s pre-game routine, his exercise regimen, and his simple enjoyment of baseball. But that doesn’t mean it was the right thing to do, nor the smart thing – just that nobody this good had previously sustained a potentially career-threatening injury.

Shagging flies is not an inherently dangerous thing like jumping on trampolines and stuff.  The guy has been doing that for decades and it wasn’t a problem.  The fact that he got hurt doing it doesn’t make it “the wrong thing to do.” Just “a bad thing that went down.”

Indeed, I believe it was Ezra Pound who put it best when he said: “shit happens.”  That applies here too.

Steven Matz homers in back-to-back starts

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Mets starter Steven Matz helped his own cause again, belting a solo home run in the top of the third inning of Tuesday’s game against the Phillies. Matz turned on a 1-1 breaking ball from Cy Young contender Aaron Nola, breaking a scoreless tie.

Matz also homered in his previous start against the Marlins last Thursday. According to MLB Stat of the Day, he is the third Mets pitcher to homer in back-to-back starts, joining Tom Seaver (1972) and Ron Darling (1989).

Matz is the fourth full-time pitcher to hit multiple home runs this season, joining the Reds’ Michael Lorenzen (four), and the Cardinals’ John Gant and Miles Mikolas (two each). The last Mets pitcher to hit multiple home runs in a season was Noah Syndergaard, who hit three in 2016.

Along with the bat, Matz has also been dealing on the mound. As of this writing, he has held the Phillies scoreless over five innings despite walking five batters and allowing two hits.