Twins offense finds a new low in Jered Weaver’s no-hitter

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Jerome Williams hadn’t pitched a complete game since 2003 before shutting out the Twins on Tuesday. That was humiliating. What followed Wednesday was even more distressing.

Jered Weaver pitched his first no-hitter as the Angels routed the Twins 9-0. It gave the struggling Halos a three-game sweep at home and dropped the Twins to an MLB-worst 6-18 on the season.

The Twins didn’t even seem to be trying Wednesday. Weaver had good stuff, but it’s doubtful he would have no-hit any other lineup tonight. Manager Ron Gardenhire also phoned it in. Even though his top relievers were all rested, he let the game get out of hand before going to the bullpen in the third. He also allowed the same nine players make all 27 outs in the contest.

Of course, his hands were somewhat tied there, what with the Justin Morneau injury and the move to drop Sean Burroughs from the roster to add catching depth in the form of the league’s worst hitter: Drew Butera. The Twins also have Clete Thomas hacking away in right field instead of the superior Ben Revere, who is back in Triple-A.

Minnesota already appears to be pretty much done for in the AL Central, but while selling is option, tradeable assets are few and far between. Francisco Liriano could have been one, but his awful showing thus far is a big reason the team is 6-18. Denard Span is the only piece that figures to fetch much on the market. But while he might bring back a quality young infielder the Twins could use, the future looks pretty bleak at the moment.

The harrowing tale of the end of Bobby Jenks’ baseball career

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Bobby Jenks was a key part of the 2005 world champion White Sox. By 2010, his effectiveness as a closer fell off and he signed with the Boston Red Sox for the 2011 season. He’d pitch in only 19 games that year, suffer a back injury and would never pitch again.

In the year or so after that, we heard that Jenks was arrested for driving under the influence. And then we heard that his back surgery was botched, and his baseball career was over. Then, after years of silence, we learned last spring that Jenks won $5.1 million in a medical malpractice suit against the doctor who performed his surgery.

We did not, however, know all the details until Bobby Jenks wrote about them at the Players’ Tribune this morning. This is must-click link stuff, folks.

Jenks talks about how a seemingly innocuous pitch to Jorge Posada in an early-season Red Sox-Yankees game in 2011 was the last pitch he’d ever throw. He talks about the presumably simple surgery that would supposedly get him back on the field. And then the scary complications in which he almost died due to leaking spinal fluid resulting from the botched surgery. Then, after using painkillers to deal with back pain, Jenks’ fell into drug addiction, all of which culminated in him finding himself half-naked and crazed in a car that didn’t belong to him with police and rescue workers surrounding him.

Jenks got clean but his wife left him. And then he mounted a multi-year lawsuit during which he learned that the reason his back surgery was screwed up was because the surgeon was performing two surgeries at one time, which is an apparently common practice called “concurrent surgery,” that sounds like it totally should NOT be a common practice.

Yet Jenks has survived. He’s been sober for over seven years and he seems to be in a good place. But boy did he have to go through something harrowing to get there. Definitely take the time to read it.