Jered Weaver stymies Twins for first career no-hitter

15 Comments

We’ve got a big no-no alert tonight out in Anaheim.

Angels starter Jered Weaver is just three outs away from completing a no-hitter against the Twins. He’s fanned eight batters and walked just one in a dominant showing against a punchless Minnesota lineup, and is sitting on 111 pitches as the game moves to the bottom of the eight inning.

We’ll update Weaver’s progress out by out.

****************

UPDATE, 12:32 AM: Twins reliever Matt Capps retired Vernon Wells, Albert Pujols and Kendrys Morales in order in the bottom of the eighth. Weaver will take the mound in the ninth with a shot at history.

****************

UPDATE, 12:33 AM: Weaver gets the Twins’ Jamey Carroll to fly out to left field for the first out.

****************

UPDATE, 12:35 AM: Weaver fans Denard Span, painting a called third strike inside. Two down.

****************

UPDATE, 12:36 AM: Twins second baseman Alexi Casilla sent a fly ball to the warning track in right field that was chased down by Torii Hunter for the third out. That’s it. Weaver’s first career no-hitter.

“I’m at a loss for words right now, man,” Weaver told the Angels’ television broadcast and the 27,000 fans at Angel Stadium after completing the feat. “It hasn’t even kicked in yet. Thank you guys for all the support.”

The 29-year-old right-hander finished with a pitch count of 121 (77 of which were strikes) and nine punchouts.

Nationals’ major leaguers to continue offering financial assistance to minor leaguers

Sean Doolittle
Tom Williams/CQ-Roll Call, Inc via Getty Images
1 Comment

On Sunday, we learned that while the Nationals would continue to pay their minor leaguers throughout the month of June, their weekly stipend would be lowered by 25 percent, from $400 to $300. In an incredible act of solidarity, Nationals reliever Sean Doolittle and his teammates put out a statement, saying they would be covering the missing $100 from the stipends.

After receiving some criticism, the Nationals reversed course, agreeing to pay their minor leaguers their full $400 weekly stipend.

Doolittle and co. have not withdrawn their generosity. On Wednesday, Doolittle released another statement, saying that he and his major league teammates would continue to offer financial assistance to Nationals minor leaguers through the non-profit organization More Than Baseball.

The full statement:

Washington Nationals players were excited to learn that our minor leaguers will continue receiving their full stipends. We are grateful that efforts have been made to restore their pay during these challenging times.

We remain committed to supporting them. Nationals players are partnering with More Than Baseball to contribute funds that will offer further assistance and financial support to any minor leaguers who were in the Nationals organization as of March 1.

We’ll continue to stand with them as we look forward to resuming our 2020 MLB season.

Kudos to Doolittle and the other Nationals continuing to offer a helping hand in a trying time. The players shouldn’t have to subsidize their employers’ labor expenses, but that is the world we live in today.