Fun facts from the Braves’ 15-13 win over the Phillies

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To put it mildly, the Braves and Phillies played a wild one on Wednesday, with Atlanta winning 15-13 on Chipper Jones’ walkoff homer in the 11th. It was the highest-scoring extra-inning game since 2006.

Here are a few things one doesn’t see everyday:

– Roy Halladay gave up eight runs, the most he had allowed since surrendering nine on May 5, 2007 against the Rangers.

– Halladay was working with a 6-0 lead when he gave up six runs in the fifth inning and then two more in the sixth. He was 107-0 in his career in starts in which he was given a four-run lead. The Phillies, though, let him off the hook by rallying in the seventh.

– Brian McCann hit just the fourth grand slam ever given up by Halladay (Evan Longoria hit the last in 2008). He was then poked in the eye by Michael Bourn on an errant high-five after crossing the plate.

– That was the first homer allowed by Halladay in six starts this season.

– Carlos Ruiz knocked in seven runs, besting his previous career high by two. He was the first Phillie to drive in so many runs since Jayson Werth had eight RBI against the Blue Jays on May 16, 2008. The Phillies had previously been 15-0 with Ruiz driving in at least three runs.

– Jones’s walkoff was his first since May 17, 2006 against the Marlins. It was the eighth of his career.

– 2011 NL Rookie of the Year Craig Kimbrel blew his first save in nine chances this season.

– The Phillies lost a game in which they scored 12 runs for the first time since Aug. 3, 1969.

– According to Fangraphs data, the Braves had a 2.3 percent of winning the game at one point in the fifth, saw that jump to 86.9 percent after taking an 8-6 lead in the sixth, dropped all the way back down to 2.7 percent after falling behind 12-8 in the eighth and jumped back up to 87.1 percent after taking a 13-12 lead in the ninth.

21-year-old Gleyber Torres homers twice off of 44-year-old Bartolo Colon

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Yankees second baseman Gleyber Torres was born on December 13, 1996. That year, Bartolo Colon (who turns 45 years old on Thursday) was wrapping up a season he spent with Double-A Canton-Akron and Triple-A Buffalo. He would debut in the majors the following April.

In a clash of generations, the 21-year-old Torres and Colon squared off on Monday as the Yankees visited the Rangers. Torres won the battle twice, drilling a two-run home run off of Colon in the second inning and a solo shot off of Colon in the fourth. Colon wound up giving up six runs in total on eight hits (including four homers) and a walk with four strikeouts in 5 1/3 innings.

Here is video of the first homer Torres hit:

Torres is the second-youngest Yankee in club history with a multi-homer game. Mickey Mantle was 20 years and 296 days old when he went yard twice on August 11, 1952. Torres is 21 years, 159 days old. Joe DiMaggio was 21-212 when he hit two on June 24, 1936.

So much for respecting one’s elders. We’re currently seeing a youth movement in baseball. 19-year-old Juan Soto hit his first major league homer on Monday against the Padres. 20-year-olds Ronald Acuña and Mike Soroka debuted for the Braves earlier this year. Could 19-year-old Blue Jays prospect Vladimir Guerrero, Jr. join them soon?