The Marlins are fixing a hole where the rain gets in. And the grass too.

25 Comments

Many holes, actually, though they’re expected and fairly common in new retractable roof stadiums:

A month in, the Marlins are still trying to figure out how to plug leaks in their 8,000-ton retractable roof and how to stop the grass from dying in the outfield.

The grass is dying because the roof has been closed too much and there hasn’t been enough sun when it has been open.  As for the leaks, it’s a matter of simply having lots of joints in a retractable roof and being unable to truly know where it’s leaking until the place is open for business and it, you know, rains:

“[Sunday] there were four of five spots where we had some drips coming down. The roof people were looking at those joints,” Samson said. “Again, it’s very normal [to have leaks].

“But you need it to rain and see where [the leaks are]. There have been different types of rains the last few days.

Little known fact: Samson is a a Quasi Supernormal Incremental Precipitation Inducer. Which, in layman’s terms, makes him a Rain God. But we in the media can’t call him simply that, because it would suggest that ordinary people knew something we didn’t.

Rakuten Golden Eagles sign Jabari Blash

Jabari Blash
Getty Images
2 Comments

Former Angels outfielder Jabari Blash has signed a one-year deal with the Tohoku Rakuten Golden Eagles of Nippon Professional Baseball, the team announced Friday. Per the Japan Times, the deal is said to be worth around $1.06 million. Blash was released from his contract with the Angels at the end of November.

The 29-year-old outfielder has had a rough go of it in the majors, where he failed to duplicate the promising results he delivered in the minors. While he consistently batted above .250 with 20-30 home runs per season at the Double- and Triple-A level, he petered out in back-to-back gigs with the Padres and Angels and slumped toward a .103/.200/.128 finish across 45 PA for Anaheim in 2018.

The hope, of course, is that the environment in NPB will help him get a better handle on his issues at the plate — in a best case scenario, resulting in a full-scale transformation that could make him more marketable to MLB teams in the future. To that end, Blash expects to be utilized as a cleanup batter in the Eagles’ lineup and will focus on assisting the club as they make a run toward the Japan Series.