Quote of the Weekend: Tim McCarver explains increased home run rates

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If you missed it over the weekend, during the Brewers-Cardinals game, Tim McCarver — winner of the Ford Frick Award for Broadcasting Excellence — offered a an explanation for why there are more home runs hit these days than back in his day.

Smaller parks? Worse pitching? A lively ball? Bulked up hitters? Nah. Global warming:

“It has not been proven, but I think ultimately it will be proven that the air is thinner now, there have been climactic changes over the last 50 years in the world, and I think that’s one of the reasons balls are carrying much better now than I remember.”

Joe Buck, somewhat amused at this, made an Al Gore joke, but McCarver didn’t really lighten up, saying “I think they’re going to find that out one of these days, yes I do … that’s a theory, but we’ll see.”

Not sure how I feel about all of that. On the one hand, I am always heartened when I hear people aware of and concerned by climate change and its effects because addressing the problem means first appreciating the problem.

On the other hand, it opens the door for this conversation:

Me: Look, the science is clear, climate change is real and man’s impact on that is damn nigh undeniable. We need to think about how to be better stewards of our planet!

Climate-change-denying friend:  Heh, yeah, but if you believe that, it means you think Tim McCarver is right about something.

Me: OK, fine, you have me there … Wanna go drill for oil in the park?

Anthony DeSclafani crushed a grand slam for his first career home run

Anthony DeSclafani
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Reds right-hander Anthony DeSclafani put on a show during Saturday’s matinee against the Cubs. Up 2-1 in the third inning, the hurler hooked a Brian Duensing fastball over the left field fence for his first career home run — and first career grand slam:

Grand slams are impressive no matter the player or situation, but they’re made all the more special in rare circumstances like this one. Not only is DeSclafani the first pitcher to deliver a grand slam in 2018, but he’s the first Reds hurler to do so in nearly 60 years. Per MLB.com’s Brian Scott Rippee, right-hander Bob Purkey was the last to hit a slam for the Reds in 1959, when he took Cubs reliever John Buzhardt deep in the third inning of a 12-3 drubbing.

The 28-year-old righty had a decent outing on the mound as well, holding the Cubs to two runs, four walks, and three strikeouts over 6 1/3 innings before passing the ball to reliever Michael Lorenzen. Entering Saturday, he carried a 2-1 record in three games, with a 4.60 ERA, 2.3 BB/9 and 8.6 SO/9 across 15 2/3 innings — not too shabby for someone who hasn’t pitched in the majors since 2016.

The Reds currently lead 8-2 in the bottom of the seventh.