Phil Humber far from perfect in loss to Red Sox

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Phil Humber tossed the 21st perfect game in MLB history Saturday against the Mariners, but things were different from the very first batter tonight against the Red Sox.

Humber walked leadoff man Mike Aviles before striking out Ryan Sweeney swinging. After Aviles stole second base, Dustin Pedroia singled and Adrian Gonzalez delivered an RBI double. Perfect game, no-hitter and shutout gone within the span of four batters. It only got worse from there.

Humber ended up allowing two runs in the first inning before tossing a scoreless second, but he was touched up for five more runs in the third, including a grand slam by Kevin Youkilis and a solo shot by Jarrod Saltalamacchia. The homers by Youkils and Saltalamacchia were back-to-back. Humber responded with a one-two-three fourth inning, but Saltalamacchia ripped his second home run of the game in the fifth, this time a two-run shot.

All told, Humber allowed a career-high nine runs on eight hits and three walks over five innings as part of a 10-3 loss. Going from the best game of your career to the worst? Baseball is a mighty humbling game sometimes.

Report: David Price to pay each Dodgers minor leaguer $1,000 out of his own pocket

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Francys Romero reports that, according to his sources, Dodgers pitcher David Price will pay $1,000 out of his own money to each Dodgers minor leaguer who is not on the 40-man roster during the month of June.

That’s a pretty amazing gesture from Price. It’s also extraordinarily telling that such a gesture is even necessary.

Under a March agreement with Major League Baseball, minor leaguers have been receiving financial assistance that is set to expire at the end of May. Baseball America reported earlier this week that the Dodgers will continue to pay their minor leaguers $400 per week past May 31, but it is unclear how long such payments would go. Even if one were to assume that the payments will continue throughout the month of June, however, it’s worth noting that $400 a week is not a substantial amount of money for players to live on, on which to support families, and on which to train and remain ready to play baseball if and when they are asked to return.

Price’s generosity should be lauded here, but this should not be considered a feel-good story overall. Major League Baseball, which has always woefully underpaid its minor leaguers has left them in a vulnerable position once again.