Mike Trout is hitting .419 with a 1.132 OPS at Triple-A

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One player certainly isn’t going to solve all of the Angels’ problems in the midst of a 6-12 start, particularly with veterans calling out manager Mike Scioscia in the media, but it’s tough to ignore the fact that stud prospect Mike Trout is hitting .419 at Triple-A.

As a 20-year-old, no less.

Trout is 31-for-74 (.419) with 10 extra-base hits, 11 walks, and six steals in 19 games, which is good for a .483 on-base percentage, .649 slugging percentage, and 1.132 OPS.

Now, certainly 19 games doesn’t mean Trout is ready to annihilate big-league pitching and the Angels’ logjam of first basemen, corner outfielders, and designated hitters hasn’t gone away, but most of that logjam isn’t actually, you know, hitting and there’s little reason to think guys like Bobby Abreu and Vernon Wells are going to suddenly turn everything around.

So when will the Angels call up Trout? Based on what Scioscia told Mike DiGiovanna of the Los Angeles Times, don’t hold your breath:

I don’t believe anything is imminent, but when you play at the level Mike is playing at now, you become more of a focal point of fans, the media and the organization. When a move is made depends on a lot of things. When you’re playing that well, you tend to push the door open for yourself, but right now he will continue to play [at Salt Lake] until something changes.

Sending a 20-year-old prospect to Triple-A to begin the season when he’d never played there before made plenty of sense, particularly considering the Angels’ veteran depth, but at some point you’d think Scioscia will grow tired of watching the old guys make outs. Or at least that’s what the Pacific Coast League pitchers are hoping.

Report: White Sox acquire Yonder Alonso from Indians

Yonder Alonso
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The White Sox have reportedly picked up first baseman Yonder Alonso from the Indians, according to Stadium. The return for Alonso is expected to be nothing more flashy than a “fringe prospect,” though the minutiae of the deal is still pending a formal announcement from both teams.

Alonso, 31, inked a two-year deal with the Indians during the 2017 offseason. His first campaign with the club yielded a modest .250/.317/.421 batting line, 23 home runs, .738 OPS and 0.7 fWAR in 574 PA. The real boon for the White Sox may not be a passable veteran bat, however, but something more intangible — like Alonso’s clout with his brother-in-law and highly-coveted free agent slugger, Manny Machado.

While Alonso’s 2018 output represented a significant decline from the career-best numbers he posted in 2017, he’s still a solid contributor at the plate and, more importantly, slated to remain under team control for the next two years with just $8 million owed in 2019 and a $9 million option in 2020. As MLB.com’s Anthony Castrovince notes, the $17 million the Indians just erased from their payroll should give them enough room to accommodate the contracts for right-handers Trevor Bauer and Corey Kluber — a bonus regardless of what they happen to get in the trade.