Giving Tiger Stadium some love too

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Everyone went all out for Fenway Park’s 100th anniversary on Friday. But if there was any justice in the world there would have been two grand old parks celebrating their centennials. Because Tiger Stadium would have turned 100 that day too.

Yes, I realize that I am nearly 15 years too late to cry about this, but I still cry. Tiger Stadium was where I discovered baseball, dammit, and where I fell in love with it. And I realize that my case is unique in that, because of a connected relative, I always had decent seats and didn’t have to deal with obstructed views and overhangs. I’m also totally aware of how the time and place in which Tiger Stadium fell into disrepair made it impossible that it would ever get a Fenway-style rehab done. The ship sailed, I realize. It sailed long ago. And everyone tells me that Comerica Park is nice (I’m going there for the first time this summer).

Still, I’m a little agitated to know that, as Fenway stood festooned with banners and flags and bore witness to legends of the past walking on that field on Friday afternoon, the place where Tiger Stadium used to be stood empty and mostly neglected and, one day, will be nearly forgotten.

Chris Jaffe wrote a nice piece about Tiger Stadium this morning over at The Hardball Times. Give it a read and then pour one out for the great old place that used to stand at the corner of Michigan and Trumbull.

RHP Fairbanks, Rays agree to 3-year, $12 million contract

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Dave Nelson/USA TODAY Sports
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ST. PETERSBURG, Fla. — Reliever Pete Fairbanks and the Tampa Bay Rays avoided arbitration when they agreed Friday to a three-year, $12 million contract that could be worth up to $24.6 million over four seasons.

The deal includes salaries of $3,666,666 this year and $3,666,667 in each of the next two seasons. The Rays have a $7 million option for 2026 with a $1 million buyout.

His 2024 and 2025 salaries could increase by $300,000 each based on games finished in the previous season: $150,000 each for 35 and 40.

Tampa Bay’s option price could increase by up to $6 million, including $4 million for appearances: $1 million each for 60 and 70 in 2025; $500,000 for 125 from 2023-25 and $1 million each for 135, 150 and 165 from 2023-25. The option price could increase by $2 million for games finished in 2025: $500,000 each for 25, 30, 35 and 40.

Fairbanks also has a $500,000 award bonus for winning the Hoffman/Rivera reliever of the year award and $200,000 for finishing second or third.

The 29-year-old right-hander is 11-10 with a 2.98 ERA and 15 saves in 111 appearances, with all but two of the outings coming out of the bullpen since being acquired by the Rays from the Texas Rangers in July 2019.

Fairbanks was 0-0 with a 1.13 ERA in 24 appearances last year after beginning the season on the 60-day injured list with a right lat strain.

Fairbanks made his 2022 debut on July 17 and tied for the team lead with eight saves despite being sidelined more than three months. In addition, he is 0-0 with a 3.60 ERA in 12 career postseason appearances, all with Tampa Bay.

He had asked for a raise from $714,400 to $1.9 million when proposed arbitration salaries were exchanged Jan. 13, and the Rays had offered for $1.5 million.

Fairbanks’ agreement was announced two days after left-hander Jeffrey Springs agreed to a $31 million, four-year contract with Tampa Bay that could be worth $65.75 million over five seasons.

Tampa Bay remains scheduled for hearings with right-handers Jason Adam and Ryan Thompson, left-hander Colin Poche, third baseman Yandy Diaz and outfielder Harold Ramirez.