Daisuke Matsuzaka makes first minor league rehab start

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Daisuke Matsuzaka officially kicked off his minor league rehab assignment tonight with High-A Salem. Sean McAdam of CSNNE.com has the details.

Matsuzaka, who underwent Tommy John surgery last June, allowed three runs on six hits over four innings while striking out three and walking none. He gave up two runs in the first inning (including a home run to the first batter he faced) and another solo homer in he second. Dice-K was pulled after throwing 40 out of 57 pitches for strikes.

Matsuzaka can spend a maximum of 30 days on his rehab assignment, so he’s on pace to make around five total starts in the minors before returning to the majors at some point next month. The Red Sox appear committed to keeping Daniel Bard in the rotation, but Dice-K could be an alternative if there is a change of plans. Aaron Cook, who is pitching well with Triple-A Pawtucket, is another option if a change is made in the rotation.

Matsuzaka, 31, is owed $10 million this season in the final year of his six-year, $52 million contract.

Twins to retire Joe Mauer’s No. 7

AP Photo/Jim Mone
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Twins senior director of communications Dustin Morse announced that the Twins will honor former C/1B Joe Mauer by retiring his uniform number 7. Mauer announced his retirement from baseball on November 9.

Mauer will join Harmon Killebrew (No. 3), Tony Oliva (No. 6), Tom Kelly (No. 10), Kent Hrbek (No. 14), Rod Carew (No. 29), Kirby Pucket (No. 34), and Bert Blyleven (No. 28) as Twins to have their numbers retired.

Mauer, 35, spent 15 seasons in the majors, all with the Twins. He posted a career .306/.388/.439 triple-slash line with 143 home runs and 923 RBI. He won the AL MVP Award in 2009, won the batting title three times, earned three Gold Gloves and five Silver Sluggers, and made the AL All-Star team six times. Sadly, his career was limited due to injuries, including a concussion that caused him to move from catcher to first base.

Five years from now, Mauer will appear on the Hall of Fame ballot. There will certainly be some arguments for and against his candidacy. He retired with 55.1 career Wins Above Replacement, according to Baseball Reference, which definitely puts him in the conversation. But, as always, there’s never a consensus.