Yes, Calvin Pickering, Carlos Baerga and Nick Esasky showed up for the Fenway bash

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There was no keeping up with all 216 players to show up on the Fenway Park field for the 100th anniversary celebration today. Fortunately, the Boston Globe has a list of all those in attendance.

Among the one-and-done Red Sox there were Carlos Baerga, Mark Whiten, Nick Esasky, Calvin Pickering, Sean Casey, Luis Alicea (I guess it only seemed like he was there for five years of mediocrity), Anastacio Martinez, Nick Green, James Lofton (no, that wasn’t Kenny), Kevin Jarvis, Wayne Gomes, Billy Jo Robidoux, Scott Schoeneweis and Dave Valle (.158 in 76 AB for the ’94 Red Sox).

There were plenty of notable absences, too. We knew Curt Schilling wasn’t coming, and Roger Clemens probably has some other things on his mind. But Wade Boggs couldn’t make it. Semi-active major leaguers Manny Ramirez and Johnny Damon weren’t there (Manny’s suspension might not have permitted him to be on the field anyway). Trot Nixon reportedly was attending his son’s Little League game. Yankees employees John Flaherty, Tony Pena and David Cone apparently weren’t willing to put on Red Sox uniforms. Dave Roberts had coaching obligations with the Padres.

Some other former Red Sox missing: Fred Lynn, Mike Greenwell, Ellis Burks, Bill Mueller, John Valentin, Troy O’Leary, Doug Mirabelli, Orlando Cabrera, Mark Bellhorn, Marty Barrett, Rickey Henderson, J.D. Drew, Bob Stanley and Rich Garces.

Angels fire back at Rob Manfred’s comments re: Mike Trout

AP Photo/Ted S. Warren
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Angels outfielder Mike Trout‘s marketability has been a topic of conversation in recent days as the best players in baseball converged upon Washington, D.C. for the All-Star Game. We learned that, according to one firm that measures consumer appeal of personalities, Trout is as recognizable to the average American as Brooklyn Nets reserve forward Kenneth Faried, despite being far and away the best player in baseball and one of the greatest players ever to play the game.

Commissioner Rob Manfred also addressed Trout’s marketability, Gabe Lacques of USA TODAY Sports reported. Manfred said, “Mike has made decisions on what he wants to do, doesn’t want to do, how he wants to spend his free time or not spend his free time. I think we could help him make his brand very bug. But he has to make a decision to engage. It takes time and effort.”

The Angels fired back on Wednesday, releasing a statement that said:

On behalf of the Angels Organization and baseball fans everywhere, congratulations to Mike Trout on another outstanding All-Star Game performance.

Mike Trout is an exceptional ambassador for the game. Combined with his talent, his solid character creates a perfect role model for young people everywhere. Each year, Mike devotes a tremendous amount of his time and effort contributing to our Organization, and marketing Major League Baseball. He continually chooses to participate in the community, visiting hospitals, schools, and countless other charities. One of Mike’s traits that people admire most is his humility. His brand is built upon generously spending his time engaging with fans, both at home and on the road, while remaining a remarkable baseball player and teammate.

In addition, Mike spends quality time as a husband, son, brother, uncle, and friend. We applaud him for prioritizing his personal values over commercial self-promotion. That is rare in today’s society and stands out as much as his extraordinary talent.

It’s not on Trout to build a brand that appeals to MLB’s marketing department, so the Angels are right to back Trout’s decision to stay out of the limelight. The Angels’ motivation likely isn’t entirely selfless, however, as supporting him in this situation may make it more enticing for him to sign a contract extension before his current contract expires after the 2020 season.