Peter Gammons called out in the Boston Globe

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Media spats tend not to interest most people, but this one is pretty notable: Peter Gammons, Boston icon, called out in the pages of his old paper, the Boston Globe:

During his weekly appearance on 98.5 The Sports Hub’s “Felger and Massarotti’’ show last Wednesday, Gammons asserted that Globe reporter Bob Hohler should reveal the anonymous sources from his bombshell story last October on the factors contributing to the Red Sox’ historic collapse. Those factors, according to Hohler’s sources, included manager Terry Francona’s personal issues and a fractured clubhouse in which a clique of pitchers were drinking beer and eating chicken during games.

It was an absurd suggestion.

That’s Chad Finn of the Globe taking Gammons to task.

Finn notes that Gammons has since come off the notion that Hohler should reveal his source, but he still believes that the story was unnecessary and irrelevant. Which, sure, many people might feel that way. But as Finn notes, those people tend to be Red Sox fans who don’t necessarily want to hear of discord on their team, legitimate or cooked up or otherwise.

I follow a ton of reporters and columnists. Most of them keep the proper journalistic distance from the teams they cover. Some of them, I hate to say it, seem to become fan boys or apologists over time.  I don’t think Gammons is that way, but in this instance he does seem to be hitting the wrong notes, and I think Finn was right to note it.

53-year-old Rafael Palmeiro homers in independent league ball

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It was announced earlier this month that 53-year-old Rafael Palmeiro signed a contract with the Cleburne Railroaders of the independent American Association, joining his son, former minor leaguer Patrick Palmeiro. The four-time All-Star went 0-for-8 to begin his stint with the club before launching a solo homer in the fifth inning last night. Check it out below.

If we’re being technical here, that was his first home run since July 30, 2005. He hit the homer off 28-year-old Trey McNutt, former prospect with the Cubs and Padres. Palmeiro made his major league debut in 1986, three years before McNutt was born.

Palmeiro told Ken Rosenthal of The Athletic last December that he was thinking about a comeback, but he understandably didn’t garner any serious consideration from MLB teams. This comeback attempt might not lead anywhere, but hey, he gets to show that he can still mash while hitting in the same lineup with his son. Palmeiro did that once before with the independent Sugar Land Skeeters in 2015, though it was just a one-game thing. As for the Railroaders, the national media attention can only help them.

Palmeiro is one of just six players in MLB history to reach 3,000 hits and 500 home runs, but he’s been a disgraced figure in the game since a failed drug test for performance-enhancing drugs in 2005. He dropped off the Hall of Fame ballot in 2014.