Yu Darvish limits Tigers to one run in third major league start

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After giving up a total of seven runs (six earned) on 17 hits and eight walks over 11 1/3 innings against the Twins and Mariners in his first two major league starts, Yu Darvish had the best outing of his brief career tonight against the powerhouse Tigers. Go figure.

Darvish limited the Tigers to just one run on two hits over 6 1/3 innings as part of a 10-3 win. The only run scored on an RBI ground out by Don Kelly in the bottom of the fourth inning. His command was still a bit shaky at times, as he walked five and struck out five while throwing 70 out of 121 pitches for strikes. Still, he managed to make it through six innings for the first time.

Mike Napoli caught Darvish’s first two major league starts, but it’s worth noting that Yorvit Torrealba was behind the plate tonight. Rangers manager Ron Washington wants to stay away from using one catcher in particular for Darvish’s outings, so they’ll likely continue to alternate in the future.

Darvish now owns a 3.57 ERA and 14/13 K/BB ratio over his first 17 2/3 innings in the big leagues. He’ll have another tough test next week when he faces the Yankees at home.

There is a “one million percent” chance Aroldis Champan will opt-out of his deal

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Ken Rosenthal of The Athletic reports that there is a “one million percent” chance Yankees closer Aroldis Chapman will opt out once the season ends.

Just going by the math this makes perfect sense, of course.

Chapman signed a five-year, $86 million deal with the Yankees before the 2017 season. Pursuant to the terms of the deal he’ll make $15 million a year in 2020 and 2021 (he was given an $11 million signing bonus that was finished being paid out last year). This past season the qualifying offer was $17.9 million. Craig Kimbrel of the Cubs just signed a deal that will pay him $16 million in 2020, 2021, and 2022 (he’s making a prorated $16 million this year). Other top closer salaries at the moment include Kenley Jansen ($19,333,334); and Wade Davis ($18 million).

It’s fair to say that Chapman fits into that group and, I think it’s safe to say, more teams would take him than those guys if they were all freely available. As such, Chapman opting out to get more money makes all kinds of sense. Heck, opting out, getting slapped with a qualifying offer, accepting it and then hitting the market unencumbered after the 2020 season would stand him in better financial stead than if he didn’t opt-out in the first place.

The question is whether the Yankees will let it get that far or whether they’ll approach him to renegotiate the final couple of years on the deal or to add some years onto the back of it. If they’re smart they will.