Cliff Lee shuts out the Giants for ten innings, Phillies lose

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Blast living in the eastern time zone. For, because I went to bed at a reasonable hour, I missed an unreasonably good pitching matchup: Cliff Lee vs. Matt Cain, each of whom shut the other side out for nine innings. Those nine innings took only one hour and fifty-minutes, by the way.

The difference: Cliff Lee went on to do it for a tenth inning. And he needed only 102 pitches to do it. In completing the tenth inning, Lee was only the fourth guy to do it in the 21st century. Aaron Harang did it once. Mark Mulder did too. Roy Halladay did it twice, naturally. And now Lee.

But sadly it was not enough as the Giants got two more innings of shutout relief while Antonio Bastardo allowed a single, then had a base runner reach on an error and then surrendered a walkoff single to Melky Cabrera, ending the game.

I suppose one could do a half-empty, half-full thing here.  The half-empty crowd has to ask how both of these offenses struggled so mightily. Even against a couple of aces, one would hope that hitters would see more pitches than they did (each side needed only 114 pitches to get through 11 innings).  One would also have to seriously question Charlie Manuel’s decision to have Freddy Galvis bunt in the tenth inning and then send Jim Thome and John Mayberry to bat when contact was key (there was a runner on third, after all). A strikeout and a flyout ended the threat.

Since I have no vested interest in either team’s offense, however, I’m content to go with the half-full of a a pitching orgy. And, actually, that glass is overflowing, because based on the box score alone this looked awesome. I will spend a good bit of my morning watching the game on replay.

RHP Fairbanks, Rays agree to 3-year, $12 million contract

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Dave Nelson/USA TODAY Sports
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ST. PETERSBURG, Fla. — Reliever Pete Fairbanks and the Tampa Bay Rays avoided arbitration when they agreed Friday to a three-year, $12 million contract that could be worth up to $24.6 million over four seasons.

The deal includes salaries of $3,666,666 this year and $3,666,667 in each of the next two seasons. The Rays have a $7 million option for 2026 with a $1 million buyout.

His 2024 and 2025 salaries could increase by $300,000 each based on games finished in the previous season: $150,000 each for 35 and 40.

Tampa Bay’s option price could increase by up to $6 million, including $4 million for appearances: $1 million each for 60 and 70 in 2025; $500,000 for 125 from 2023-25 and $1 million each for 135, 150 and 165 from 2023-25. The option price could increase by $2 million for games finished in 2025: $500,000 each for 25, 30, 35 and 40.

Fairbanks also has a $500,000 award bonus for winning the Hoffman/Rivera reliever of the year award and $200,000 for finishing second or third.

The 29-year-old right-hander is 11-10 with a 2.98 ERA and 15 saves in 111 appearances, with all but two of the outings coming out of the bullpen since being acquired by the Rays from the Texas Rangers in July 2019.

Fairbanks was 0-0 with a 1.13 ERA in 24 appearances last year after beginning the season on the 60-day injured list with a right lat strain.

Fairbanks made his 2022 debut on July 17 and tied for the team lead with eight saves despite being sidelined more than three months. In addition, he is 0-0 with a 3.60 ERA in 12 career postseason appearances, all with Tampa Bay.

He had asked for a raise from $714,400 to $1.9 million when proposed arbitration salaries were exchanged Jan. 13, and the Rays had offered for $1.5 million.

Fairbanks’ agreement was announced two days after left-hander Jeffrey Springs agreed to a $31 million, four-year contract with Tampa Bay that could be worth $65.75 million over five seasons.

Tampa Bay remains scheduled for hearings with right-handers Jason Adam and Ryan Thompson, left-hander Colin Poche, third baseman Yandy Diaz and outfielder Harold Ramirez.