2011 first-rounder Dylan Bundy finally allows a baserunner

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Orioles prospect Dylan Bundy is up to nine hitless innings for low-A Delmarva, but he did walk a batter last night. It’s the only batter to reach against him so far this season.

Bundy, the fourth overall pick in last year’s draft, has been limited to three innings an outing by the Orioles thus far, hence the total of nine innings pitched to date. He’s struck out 15 of the 28 batters he’s faced.

The Orioles gave Bundy a major league contract out of high school, so he’s already on the 40-man roster. Still, they’re being exceptionally careful with him anyway. Possessing a high-90s fastball and a strong curve, he has as much upside as any pitcher in the minors. Still, while he might actually be capable of succeeding in the majors at the tender age of 19, it’s highly unlikely that he’ll pitch for Baltimore this season. It’ll be tougher for the Orioles to hold him back next year if he starts the year overmatching Double-A hitters.

Yadier Molina ties record for the most games caught with one team

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Yadier Molina has two World Series rings, multiple Gold Gloves, Platinum Gloves, All-Star appearances and a Silver Slugger award. He now has an all-time record too.

The record: the most games caught with one team. Last night he caught his 1756th career game with the Cardinals, with ties him with Gabby Hartnett of the Cubs, who last caught in 1941 and set the record in 1940, his last season with Chicago. Molina will break the record next time he dons the tools of ignorance, likely tonight against the Phillies.

Given how badly catchers get beaten up — and Molina has taken a beating at times in his career — and given how well mastery of the position leads to a catcher earning journeyman status, as it were, it’s quite a thing to catch that many games for one team.

Given that Molina is under contract with the Cardinals for two more seasons and has stated his desire to retire a Cardinal many times, he’s likely to put that record so far out of reach that it’ll likely take at least another 78 years to break it, if indeed it is ever broken.