Quote of the Day: Cody Ross on the umpires

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As we mentioned yesterday, Cody Ross was really screwed on the called strikes that ended the Rays-Red Sox game.  And he knew it too. Here were his postgame comments:

“If I’m going up there and striking out every at-bat, I’m going to get benched,” he said. “But it’s not that way with (umpires). They can go out there and make bad calls all day, and they’re not going to be held accountable for it.

“It’s tough. It’s such a tough situation. Believe me, I’ve umpired before. It’s tough. It’s hard. But at this level, I don’t know what to say. You’ve got to bear down.”

Can’t blame him a bit. MLB says that there is umpire discipline and accountability. But if that’s the case, there is zero transparency about it. Which is probably because they believe that if umpires are called out that people will have less confidence in them or something. I personally think it’s the opposite, though. People figure out who is good and bad anyway, and then are even more critical because they think the bad umps are arrogant and immune, even if that isn’t the case.

Probably doesn’t matter. There is no indication at all that bad umpiring will be dealt with in a satisfying manner by Major League Baseball.  We’re just gonna have to deal with it.

Rangers turn the sort of triple play that has not been done in 106 years

Associated Press
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Triple plays are rare. Triple plays in which only two players touch the ball are even more rare. But last night the Texas Rangers turned a triple play that was even more rare than that. Indeed, it was the sort of triple play that had not been turned since a couple of months after the Titanic sank.

Here’s how it went down:

With the bases loaded and nobody out in the fourth inning, David Fletcher of the Angels hit a sharp one-hopper, fielded by third baseman Jurickson Profar. He stepped on third, getting the runner on second base in a force out. He then quickly tagged Taylor Ward, who had been on third base but had broken, thinking the ball was going to get through, and who froze before figuring out what to do. Profar then threw to Rougned Odor, who stepped on second to force the runner out who had been on first. Watch:

Like a lot of weird triple plays, not everyone was sure what had happened immediately. Odor, for example, had already made the third out when he touched the bag but he still attempted to tag out the runner from first, likely not yet having processed it all. The announcer wasn’t aware of it either. Understandable given how fast it all happened. It took me a couple of times watching it to figure it all out.

The historic part of it: according to STATS, Inc., it was the first triple play in 106 years in which the batter was not retired. The last time it happened: June 3, 1912, turned by the Brooklyn Dodgers against the Cincinnati Reds.