Quote of the Day: Cody Ross on the umpires

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As we mentioned yesterday, Cody Ross was really screwed on the called strikes that ended the Rays-Red Sox game.  And he knew it too. Here were his postgame comments:

“If I’m going up there and striking out every at-bat, I’m going to get benched,” he said. “But it’s not that way with (umpires). They can go out there and make bad calls all day, and they’re not going to be held accountable for it.

“It’s tough. It’s such a tough situation. Believe me, I’ve umpired before. It’s tough. It’s hard. But at this level, I don’t know what to say. You’ve got to bear down.”

Can’t blame him a bit. MLB says that there is umpire discipline and accountability. But if that’s the case, there is zero transparency about it. Which is probably because they believe that if umpires are called out that people will have less confidence in them or something. I personally think it’s the opposite, though. People figure out who is good and bad anyway, and then are even more critical because they think the bad umps are arrogant and immune, even if that isn’t the case.

Probably doesn’t matter. There is no indication at all that bad umpiring will be dealt with in a satisfying manner by Major League Baseball.  We’re just gonna have to deal with it.

The Dodgers do not have a general manager, but they have an assistant general manager

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LAS VEGAS — Farhan Zaidi left his job as the general manager of the Los Angeles Dodgers to become the president of baseball operations for the San Francisco Giants. While Dodgers president Andrew Friedman remains at the top of the baseball operations department, Zaidi’s departure has left the Dodgers without a general manager. It happens. It also happens that the Dodgers do not plan to replace Zaidi with a new general manager any time soon. They just said so last week.

They do, however, have an assistant general manager now. It’s Jeff Kingston, late of the Seattle Mariners, where he served as Jerry Dipoto’s assistant. Now he is an assistant with no one, nominally, to assist. Seems like some sort of dividing by zero error, philosophically speaking, but we’ll just assume it’ll sort itself out.

Two less cosmic takeaways from this: 1. Kingston is an analytics guy who has typically advised the wheeler-dealer — Dipoto — so it’s fairly safe to assume he’ll do that in Los Angeles too; and 2. that a team is happy to proceed without a general manager should tell you where general managers, well, in general, stand in this age of title inflation in baseball front offices.

I imagine that, after some time in the organization, Kingston will be named the actual general manager with no real change in his duties, further underscoring that, in this day and age, the title of GM is like the value of a Zimbabwean dollar.