Ubaldo Jimenez says he doesn’t deserve suspension, isn’t apologizing, didn’t hit Troy Tulowitzki on purpose

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Ubaldo Jimenez spoke to the media this morning and reiterated that he didn’t hit former teammate Troy Tulowitzki on purpose yesterday, saying he shouldn’t be suspended.

Jordan Bastian of MLB.com described Jimenez as having “leaned back in his chair inside the Indians’ clubhouse on Monday morning, calmly disagreeing with the notion that a suspension was warranted.”

Asked about the pitch, Jimenez said:

Hit by pitches happen every day in the game. It’s not a surprise that somebody gets hit, especially a guy like him. You have to try to go inside on him. … I said already that I didn’t mean to hit him. It was a pitch that got away. I had five walks in the game. I was everywhere.

Asked about former manager Jim Tracy calling for his suspension and calling it “the most gutless act I have seen in 35 years of professional baseball” Jimenez said:

I can’t control what people say. People act like this is the first time that somebody got hit. It happens in the game. That’s part of the game. It’s always been part of the game.

Jimenez also said he has no plans to apologize to Tulowitzki, who’s day-to-day with a bruised elbow after X-rays came back negative.

Bastian has a lot more on the situation at MLB.com, including some thoughts from Indians manager Manny Acta and further background details.

Ex-Angels employee charged in overdose death of Tyler Skaggs

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FORT WORTH, Texas — A former Angels employee has been charged with conspiracy to distribute fentanyl in connection with last year’s overdose death of Angels pitcher Tyler Skaggs, prosecutors in Texas announced Friday.

Eric Prescott Kay was arrested in Fort Worth, Texas, and made his first appearance Friday in federal court, according to Erin Nealy Cox, the U.S. Attorney for the Northern District of Texas. Kay was communications director for the Angels.

Skaggs was found dead in his hotel room in the Dallas area July 1, 2019, before the start of what was supposed to be a four-game series against the Texas Rangers. The first game was postponed before the teams played the final three games.

Skaggs died after choking on his vomit with a toxic mix of alcohol and the powerful painkillers fentanyl and oxycodone in his system, a coroner’s report said. Prosecutors accused Kay of providing the fentanyl to Skaggs and others, who were not named.

“Tyler Skaggs’s overdose – coming, as it did, in the midst of an ascendant baseball career – should be a wake-up call: No one is immune from this deadly drug, whether sold as a powder or hidden inside an innocuous-looking tablet,” Nealy Cox said.

If convicted, Kay faces up to 20 years in prison. Federal court records do not list an attorney representing him, and an attorney who previously spoke on his behalf did not immediately return a message seeking comment.