In which Yamaico Navarro netted the Red Sox their two best shortstops

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Bear with me for a minute, please.

Pedro Ciriaco  impressed once again Sunday, stealing two bases immediately after entering the game as a pinch-runner and then doubling in a run as part of Boston’s 5-1 win over Minnesota. He’s hitting .415/.442/.659 with seven steals in eight attempts this spring. His one homer was a walkoff job against the Marlins on March 12.

If you haven’t heard of Ciriaco, you’re hardly alone. There wasn’t much reason to know him until a couple of weeks ago, but now he seems poised to claim a spot on Boston’s bench. Ciriaco was signed to a minor league deal by the Red Sox on January 3, three weeks after he was non-tendered by the Pirates.

This is where Yamaico Navarro comes in.

The Red Sox surrendered Navarro to land Mike Aviles from the Royals at the trade deadline last year. Aviles is now Boston’s starting shortstop. The Royals, though, quickly soured on Navarro and decided he was the most expendable player on their 40-man roster when they needed to clear a spot in December. As a result, he was traded to the Pirates for two prospects who probably won’t ever make the majors, thus making Ciriaco expendable in Pittsburgh.

Of course, Ciriaco isn’t nearly this good. In fact, he was brutal in Triple-A last year, hitting .231/.243/.300 in 277 at-bats, and he’s managed a .700 OPS just once in seven minor league seasons. He is a clear step up from Aviles with the glove, though, and he could be pretty useful as a pinch-runner and late-inning defensive replacement.

Now, I wouldn’t necessarily expect either Aviles or Ciriaco to be Red Sox in 2013 and beyond, but it is pretty interesting to see Boston filling two of its 2012 roster spots with a couple of pieces they only have thanks to a guy the Royals took one look at and quickly dismissed.

The Cubs are considering a sportsbook at Wrigley Field

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With the nationwide ban on sports gambling gone — and with sports gambling regulations slowly being implemented on a state-by-state basis — any number of businesses are considering getting in on the action. Among those businesses are the Chicago Cubs.

ESPN reports that the club is considering opening gambling facilities in and around Wrigley Field which might include betting windows, automated kiosks or, possibly, a full, casino-style sportsbook. They’re characterized as preliminary discussions as the team awaits the Illinois governor’s signature on recently-passed legislation allowing gambling. The Cubs aren’t commenting, but a source tells ESPN that nothing has been done yet. It’s just talk at the moment.

If the Cubs move forward from the talking stage it will cost them a pretty penny: a four-year license will, under Illinois’ new law, cost them $10 million.

Now: let’s see the White Sox take some action this year. I can think of nothing more fun than sports gambling at what was once Comiskey Park on the 100th anniversary of the Black Sox scandal.