Report: Juan Carlos Oviedo faces six-week suspension

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Juan Carlos Oviedo (formerly known as Leo Nunez) is still in his native Dominican Republic, working to finish the assigned hours of community service that stand between him and a freshly-stamped work visa.

But community service won’t be the end of his punishment for years of committing identify fraud.

According to Barry Jackson of the Miami Herald, Major League Baseball will suspend Oviedo for six weeks once he is cleared to return to the United States. MLB was planning on also suspending him for two weeks of spring camp, but Opening Night is now just days away.

Oviedo, 30, tallied 36 saves in 42 chances last season as the Marlins’ closer. Miami won’t have to pay any part of his $6 million salary for 2012 while he is suspended and/or on the restricted list.

Something to think about: Oviedo turned himself in at the dying request of his father and is still being given a stiff, six-week punishment by the MLB commissioner’s office. What does that mean for a guy like Roberto Hernandez (formerly known as Fausto Carmona), who was outed by another person?

Report: David Price to pay each Dodgers minor leaguer $1,000 out of his own pocket

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Francys Romero reports that, according to his sources, Dodgers pitcher David Price will pay $1,000 out of his own money to each Dodgers minor leaguer who is not on the 40-man roster during the month of June.

That’s a pretty amazing gesture from Price. It’s also extraordinarily telling that such a gesture is even necessary.

Under a March agreement with Major League Baseball, minor leaguers have been receiving financial assistance that is set to expire at the end of May. Baseball America reported earlier this week that the Dodgers will continue to pay their minor leaguers $400 per week past May 31, but it is unclear how long such payments would go. Even if one were to assume that the payments will continue throughout the month of June, however, it’s worth noting that $400 a week is not a substantial amount of money for players to live on, on which to support families, and on which to train and remain ready to play baseball if and when they are asked to return.

Price’s generosity should be lauded here, but this should not be considered a feel-good story overall. Major League Baseball, which has always woefully underpaid its minor leaguers has left them in a vulnerable position once again.