How limited are the Dodgers new owners?

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I’m writing this from a hotel room in Los Angeles, where — despite it being just before 5am as I type this — my body thinks it’s still on eastern time. Stupid body.

Anyway, I flew here last night and, being a wise and prudent man, made my way to the hotel bar so that I might come to quickly understand my environment and the people that inhabit it. I found them to be a curious lot, somehow taken with the notion that the Dodgers’ new ownership group — despite not taking actual control for another month — will somehow will this team into immediate contention.

I was about to educate them about just how deluded they are when it comes to such matters — see my Dodgers preview here a little later this morning to get some real talk about this team that should disabuse anyone of such assumptions — but since they were buying my drinks I decided to nod and say “well, maybe.”

But no, it’s not happening. At least not in 2012. And not just because there is no way to practically improve this team at the moment. Rather, because there may be … constraints on this ownership group due to a $ 2 billion price tag.

Magic Johnson has basically pshawed that notion, saying that the Dodgers are going to be the Yankees west. But The Economist thinks differently:

At this price, everything would have to go right for the new owners to make a profit. They are required to make costly capital improvements to Dodger Stadium as part of the deal … And although the deal has been described as a “100% cash offer”, it is doubtful that even Guggenheim has $2 billion of its own capital lying under the mattress and available to buy a baseball team. The far more likely outcome is that the acquisition will have to be financed with a heavy debt load, whose interest payments will probably siphon off much of the franchise’s revenues and limit the owners’ ability to invest in it.

We’ve obviously seen that scenario before. But this time they’re claiming that things will be different. Will the new owners damn the torpedoes, and order full speed ahead on free agent acquisitions, or will they worry about that cash flow and skew conservative?

Yasmani Grandal played himself out of NLCS Game 4

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Dodgers catcher Yasmani Grandal has not had a good postseason. Entering Monday night’s NLCS Game 3, he was batting .111/.238/.278 in 21 trips to the plate across the NLDS and the first two games of the NLCS.

Defense has also been an issue for Grandal. In Game 1 of the NLCS, Grandal was on the hook for two passed balls. In the sixth inning of Game 3 Monday night, he couldn’t corral a curve in the dirt, which allowed Travis Shaw to score the Brewers’ second run of the night. Starter Walker Buehler was charged with a wild pitch. In the eighth, with Ryan Braun on first base and Shaw at the plate, Grandal again couldn’t corral a pitch in the dirt, allowing Braun to move to second base. Fortunately for the Dodgers, Alex Wood was able to escape the inning with no damage.

Manager Dave Roberts said that Austin Barnes, not Grandal, will start behind the plate for Game 4 on Tuesday night, Andy McCullough of the Los Angeles Times reports. That comes as no surprise at all. When Grandal struck out with the bases loaded in the ninth inning, Dodger fans regaled him with boos.

Barnes will be an upgrade defensively, but he’s lacking with the bat. He had an 0-for-3 performance in Game 2, though with an RBI, bringing his career slash line in the playoffs to .200/.281/.300 across 57 plate appearances. During the regular season, his career 100 adjusted OPS is a fair bit behind Grandal’s 115. Roberts is trading offense for defense in Game 4. Rich Hill will get the start opposite the Brewers’ Gio González.