Livan Hernandez released by Astros, signs with Braves

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UPDATE: Surprisingly enough, it didn’t take Hernandez long to find another gig. Jon Heyman of CBSSports.com reports that he’s signing with the Braves, who’ll apparently use the 37-year-old soft-tosser as a long reliever/spot starter. Good thing Calcaterra is on vacation today.

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Once thought to be a near-lock for the Astros’ rotation, Livan Hernandez was released today.

Hernandez signed a minor-league deal in late January and looked likely to eat some innings for an otherwise inexperienced pitching staff, but the 37-year-old right-hander got knocked around this spring and the Astros decided to give opportunities to Jordan Lyles and Kyle Weiland instead.

Hernandez was surprisingly effective for the Nationals in 2010, but allowed opponents to hit .291 off him last season while posting a 4.47 ERA in 175 innings. He struck out just 5.1 batters per nine innings and averaged 83.9 miles per hour with his fastball, so if Hernandez couldn’t crack what figures to be one of the worst rotations in baseball he may finally be finished.

Of course, I’ve said that before.

Ex-Angels employee charged in overdose death of Tyler Skaggs

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FORT WORTH, Texas — A former Angels employee has been charged with conspiracy to distribute fentanyl in connection with last year’s overdose death of Angels pitcher Tyler Skaggs, prosecutors in Texas announced Friday.

Eric Prescott Kay was arrested in Fort Worth, Texas, and made his first appearance Friday in federal court, according to Erin Nealy Cox, the U.S. Attorney for the Northern District of Texas. Kay was communications director for the Angels.

Skaggs was found dead in his hotel room in the Dallas area July 1, 2019, before the start of what was supposed to be a four-game series against the Texas Rangers. The first game was postponed before the teams played the final three games.

Skaggs died after choking on his vomit with a toxic mix of alcohol and the powerful painkillers fentanyl and oxycodone in his system, a coroner’s report said. Prosecutors accused Kay of providing the fentanyl to Skaggs and others, who were not named.

“Tyler Skaggs’s overdose – coming, as it did, in the midst of an ascendant baseball career – should be a wake-up call: No one is immune from this deadly drug, whether sold as a powder or hidden inside an innocuous-looking tablet,” Nealy Cox said.

If convicted, Kay faces up to 20 years in prison. Federal court records do not list an attorney representing him, and an attorney who previously spoke on his behalf did not immediately return a message seeking comment.