Phillies “know how much” Cole Hamels is going to cost

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There may be a positive development in the ongoing long-term contract negotiations between the Phillies and left-hander Cole Hamels. Or maybe not.

According to Jim Salisbury of CSNPhilly.com, the Phillies “know how much” Hamels will cost annually “and are set to pay it.” But the Philadelphia front office would rather do a four-year deal and the 28-year-old southpaw of course wants more.

Hamels registered a stellar 2.79 ERA and 0.99 WHIP in 32 outings last year for the National League East champions, fanning 194 batters and issuing only 44 walks across 216 innings of work. With another ace-like season, the native of Southern California could demand well over $100 million on the open market. And it’s probably a safe assumption that the Dodgers’ new ownership group is going to have interest.

Twins to retire Joe Mauer’s No. 7

AP Photo/Jim Mone
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Twins senior director of communications Dustin Morse announced that the Twins will honor former C/1B Joe Mauer by retiring his uniform number 7. Mauer announced his retirement from baseball on November 9.

Mauer will join Harmon Killebrew (No. 3), Tony Oliva (No. 6), Tom Kelly (No. 10), Kent Hrbek (No. 14), Rod Carew (No. 29), Kirby Pucket (No. 34), and Bert Blyleven (No. 28) as Twins to have their numbers retired.

Mauer, 35, spent 15 seasons in the majors, all with the Twins. He posted a career .306/.388/.439 triple-slash line with 143 home runs and 923 RBI. He won the AL MVP Award in 2009, won the batting title three times, earned three Gold Gloves and five Silver Sluggers, and made the AL All-Star team six times. Sadly, his career was limited due to injuries, including a concussion that caused him to move from catcher to first base.

Five years from now, Mauer will appear on the Hall of Fame ballot. There will certainly be some arguments for and against his candidacy. He retired with 55.1 career Wins Above Replacement, according to Baseball Reference, which definitely puts him in the conversation. But, as always, there’s never a consensus.